'Vanity project': Cynthia Nixon gets The Gong Show treatment

Discussion in 'Politics & Religion' started by SueEllenRules!, Sep 14, 2018.

  1. SueEllenRules!

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    'Vanity project': Cynthia Nixon gets The Gong Show treatment
    For all the sense that a new age of democratic socialism was dawning in New York, Andrew Cuomo won in a landslide.

    [​IMG]
    Other than Cynthia Nixon, there wasn’t another Democratic primary challenger in the country who got as much attention but such a small share of the vote — 35 percent.

    Cynthia Nixon did worse than “Sex and the City 2.”

    In fact, she barely outperformed Zephyr Teachout when she ran against Andrew Cuomo in 2014 as a complete unknown, before Bernie Sanders’ candidacy and Donald Trump’s presidency. There wasn’t another Democratic primary challenger in the country who got as much attention but such a small share of the vote — 35 percent.

    It turns out that campaigning through the sets of “The Late Show” and “The Daily Show,” while insisting your candidacy isn’t about being a celebrity or seeking national attention, isn’t effective. Cuomo’s last-minute mailer calling Nixon essentially an anti-Semite didn’t flip any counties (nor did her viral cinnamon raisin and lox bagel order). The complaints from Nixon's campaign about Democratic National Committee chairman Tom Perez and others they accused of tilting the scales for Cuomo didn’t matter to voters, either.

    It also turns out that Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s surprise primary win in June over Rep. Joe Crowley may have been a more complicated story than Nixon and her allies made it out to be. Nixon rushed to Ocasio Cortez’s victory party that night in June, wrapping herself in the giant-toppling glory.

    Nixon’s campaign took issue when they saw her referred to only as an actress, pointing out that she’s also a longtime education activist. Her aides pitched her as a wonk who’d done her homework on the issues, and said Cuomo was unprepared for a serious challenge.

    The many Cuomo haters in New York and all over the internet shook their fists and retweeted. Reporters ran to the rallies. Nixon more than doubled Teachout’s votes in 2014 — but it was nothing compared to Cuomo, who rode his own massive surge while Nixon’s campaign released a statement as the polls closed complaining that too many people were voting.

    A lot of sound. A lot of fury. Signifying?

    “Vanity project. Acting looks easy to politicians and politics looks easy to actors. Neither are,” said John Anzalone, a Democratic pollster who worked for both Obama campaigns and for Hillary Clinton’s in 2016. He compared Nixon's bid to the late actor and Republican senator Fred Thompson’s flop of a presidential campaign in 2008 after much buzz.

    As happened in just the past week in Delaware and Rhode Island primaries, Cuomo showed that a TV-heavy, establishment machine campaign still wins big races. Using Trump as his foil — after years of insisting that it wasn’t the role of the New York governor to get involved in national politics — helped turn into positives all of Cuomo’s negative attributes that have held him back: that he’s a bully, that he fights over little things, that he gets into arguments just for the sake of it.

    For all the sense that a new age of democratic socialism was dawning in New York, Cuomo won in Ocasio-Cortez’s district by a slightly bigger margin than he won statewide.

    [​IMG]
    After her loss, Cynthia Nixon's biggest fans in this election don’t see any clear future for her in politics.

    Cuomo has now seen that it doesn’t matter that he gets called a traitor by the frothy left, or that the New York Times editorial board beats him up on the way to a reluctant endorsement, or that his best friend and former campaign manager goes to jail on a corruption conviction. He still gets a blowout. He still gets as many terms in Albany as his father did, and and with more votes than Mario Cuomo got — numbers that matter to a man whose father is always on his mind.

    “Without question what the governor has done is working because what the governor has done is helping working people,” said Cuomo campaign manager Maggie Moran, in a late night interview as the final results were coming in. “Every single day, he knocks down economic barriers for people, and he does it so well that he got more votes than any candidate in the history of New York gubernatorial primaries.”

    Christine Quinn, a former New York City council speaker and Cuomo acolyte who greeted Nixon’s entry into the race with the foot-in-mouth gift of calling her an “unqualified lesbian,” was gloating at the Cuomo victory party Thursday night. “Obviously doing really well against a very aggressive campaign challenger is a very good thing if you want to run for president or any other national office,” she said.

    The governor himself didn’t respond on Thursday night to a request to talk about the lessons he sees. He also skipped going to his campaign party.

    But at the losing party, they acted like Cuomo was the one who got trounced.

    “He's no longer going to be at the center, he no longer controls the debate,” said Bill Lipton, the executive director of the Working Families Party, which backed Cuomo in his last two elections but this year became the engine for Nixon. The party now has to decide whether to try a maneuver to remove her from its ballot line and, hat-in-hand, try to get Cuomo to take it.

    This kind of comment makes the Cuomo orbit break into bitter laughter and cursing. Or this one, from Nixon’s concession speech: “When others were underestimating us, he did not—and he spent accordingly.”

    Cable news stations stayed with their hurricane coverage.

    The hope of Nixon supporters rests with others who won while she lost. Challengers took out almost all the incumbent Democratic state senators who were part of a breakaway caucus formed in 2011, back when they were protesting being boxed out of power by a series of leaders who literally went to prison. In the years since, the caucus became better known for propping up the façade of a Republican majority in Albany, with Cuomo’s not so subtle support throughout.

    On his way home from Nixon’s party, Brad Lander, a New York City council member and prominent member of the Working Families Party, ticked off priorities like health insurance, rent regulations and campaign finance reform he thinks those wins will box Cuomo into.

    “There’s a story where he still won by the same margin he won four years ago. But if you’re thinking about what legislating in Albany is going to look like next session, it’s going to be very different thanks to those state senate races,” Lander said.

    Cuomo’s campaign wanted to keep the attention on the statewide results, which also included his helping pull struggling candidates for lieutenant governor and attorney general over the line by spending his campaign cash on someone other than himself for the first time. He not only got the margin he wanted, but heads into his new term with allies instead of rivals around him.

    As for Nixon, “It was crystal clear throughout this campaign that the Nixon team was caught in a feedback loop—since everyone they talked to thought that Andrew Cuomo was evil, they thought everyone thought he was evil,” said Stu Loeser, a former press secretary for Mike Bloomberg who now runs his own consulting shop in New York. “Had they spent any significant time in the suburbs, exurbs, upstate or even in the parts of New York City that aren’t the most liberal, they might have realized that most Democrats aren’t as liberal as they are.”

    National Democratic operatives were left annoyed that a primary that never went anywhere in a state that is far from competitive had gobbled up so much attention.

    “It says something when a cinnamon raisin bagel in New York gets more national attention than a candidate who could become the governor of a swing state in the Midwest,” said Jared Leopold, communications director for the Democratic Governors Association.

    Nixon's biggest fans in this election don’t see any clear future for her in politics.

    “I don’t know what kind of role she would want to be play going forward,” Lander said. “She’s not going to be the governor. But she played an important role in this election.”

    https://www.politico.com/amp/story/2018/09/14/cynthia-nixon-loss-democratic-socialism-823878
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2018
  2. Frank Underwood

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    So Democrats are using "lesbian" as a pejorative now?

    I love how these articles are essentially mouthpieces for the establishment. It's irrelevant having two parties if they both serve right wing interests.

    So when is the Clinton camp going to lash out at all of those sexist "Cuomo bros" for supporting a man over a woman? I thought Hillary said women were sexist or influenced by men if they didn't vote for a woman over a man. Hmm, I wonder how she reconciles that with her endorsement of Cuomo. Could it be that she's actually full of shit? Nah, couldn't be that...

    Here's why it's hard for progressives to win in blue states like New York, where the Democrats are often just as corrupt and amoral as the Republicans:

    Andrew Cuomo won the New York Democratic primary, but progressives still have reason to celebrate
    It takes more than one election to upend the Democratic machine. And the races we did win will help.

    The New York Democratic primary on Thursday night might appear, at first glance, to have been a letdown for New York progressives. The attention-grabbing statewide nominating races — most notably actress and activist Cynthia Nixon’s attempt to unseat two-term incumbent governor Andrew Cuomo — all ended in defeat for the insurgent left challengers, albeit to varying degrees.

    Casual observers might now be asking what chance the left wing of the Democratic Party stands in the rest of the country if it can’t even win a primary in a state as liberal as New York. They might even wonder whether the surprise victory of self-described democratic socialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in the state's congressional primaries back in June was a mere flash in the pan.

    But actually, it’s a miracle any progressive challengers won at all, and many state legislative candidates did just that.

    In a deeply liberal state like New York, with its entrenched systems of political patronage, the odds are stacked against progressive primary challengers in a way they are not in red states, where the Democratic establishment is weaker. So while New York is indeed a blue stronghold, it’s also one of the most corrupt states in the nation — home to a powerful machine that Cuomo, whose father served three terms as governor in the 1980s and 90s, currently sits atop.

    For example, a former top aide of Cuomo’s, Joseph Percoco, was convicted of three corruption charges in March. Or, take the fact that Cuomo once created an independent body called the Moreland Commission to investigate corruption in state government, only to block and subsequently disband it when it got too close to his own office. And story after story has come out just this year about companies and people who have suddenly found success in New York after donating to the governor's campaign.

    Through a deeply entrenched system of favor-trading, Cuomo and his cronies seemingly do the bidding of monied interests, like finance and real estate, in exchange for hefty contributions. Cuomo outspent Nixon by more than eight-to-one in this election, which is easy to do when your opponent takes no corporate money. He can also apply pressure like nobody’s business: New York’s major unions, for example, endorsed Cuomo. They did so not because their rank and file members necessarily supported him, but because they knew he’d punish them if he won — while Nixon, on the off chance that she won, would not.

    Plus the state hardly makes it easy to vote in primaries: It's one of a very few states that forces citizens to declare 11 months in advance their party registration in order to be eligible to vote. And, even if voters clear that hurdle, the New York City Board of Elections is so dysfunctional that even Democratic National Committee unity commission member Nomiki Konst found herself missing from the rolls when she showed up to vote on Thursday. The board admitted in 2017 to illegally purging 117,000 Brooklyn voters, but the reforms it agreed to don’t kick in until 2020. It might not be a conspiracy by the New York Democratic Party to limit the power of non-machine candidates, but, seeing as this dysfunction benefits incumbents, nobody’s been in a rush to fix it.

    But despite the hurdles and the losses on the top of the ticket, many progressive challengers did succeed on Thursday. Of the eight members of the Independent Democratic Caucus — Democrats who caucus with the Republicans and swing the balance of power in the State Senate to the right — six were unseated by progressive challengers. (Cuomo claims that he has no connection to the IDC, but sources tell Politico this is false. The understanding is that, with a presidential run in his sights, he feels that the less progressive legislation that ever makes it to his desk, the less he has to anger liberal voters by vetoing it, or centrist donors by signing it.)

    A seventh incumbent, Martin Dilan, who is a machine politician cozy with real estate, was unseated by 27-year-old Julia Salazar, an open socialist and member of the Democratic Socialists of America. (I’m an active member of NYC DSA and volunteered for her campaign.) Salazar did this despite weeks of negative national press coverage unusual for a small state legislative race and personal attacks from Dilan.

    Like the Ocasio-Cortez win this summer, these victories were driven by small donors and grassroots operations that marshaled volunteers in numbers large enough to make an impact. Considering where progressives are at nationwide, local races are a crucial first step as we build politicians and institutions capable of taking on the establishment at the state and ultimately national levels. As numerous DSA members noted about Nixon's race this summer, the number of volunteer shifts required to make an impact on the gubernatorial race were about ten times what we did for Ocasio-Cortez, and we’re just not there yet. But that doesn’t mean we never will be.

    The American left needs to think in the long term: It's only been seven years since Occupy Wall Street brought class politics to the forefront of the conversation and made everyone wonder what the deal is with capitalism. It’s been three years since "democratic socialism" bubbled its way up into the national consciousness with the Bernie Sanders campaign. We’re going to lose most of the time at this point, but that we’ve already won as much as we have should inspire everyone to the left of the Clintons to clear their calendars.

    We can debate the finer points of social democracy and democratic socialism once we’ve defeated the reactionary right and neoliberal center.

    Of course, it’s going to take more than some good politicians to win the world we deserve: As history has shown, it takes massive direct actions and a large and militant labor movement to create enough pressure for our elected officials to pass even the mildest of social democratic reforms. But it certainly can’t hurt to have people in the halls of power whose message of economic democracy empowers their constituents to ask for more— people who aren’t paid to run for office by the same power players who profit off keeping us hungry, sick and poor. We inched one step closer to that goal last night. Let’s keep our eyes on the prize.

    Source: https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opini...ic-primary-progressives-still-have-ncna909561



     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2018
  3. SueEllenRules!

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    Cynthia Nixon Campaign Blames 'Extremely High Turnout' for Election Loss to Andrew Cuomo
    Cynthia Nixon's campaign team appeared to partially blame her primary loss to New York Governor Andrew Cuomo on "extremely high" voter turnout resulting from Cuomo's heavy ad spending.

    As Governor Andrew Cuomo moved closer toward securing a third term on Thursday evening, claiming the Democratic nomination in New York, rival Cynthia Nixon appeared to take the landslide loss in stride—for the most part.

    "While the result tonight wasn't what we had hoped for, I'm not discouraged. I'm inspired. I hope you are too," Nixon tweeted on Thursday evening.

    With 93 percent of precincts reporting, Cuomo had 65 percent of the vote compared with her 35 percent.

    While Nixon called on voters to become change makers, her campaign team seemed to send a different message, attributing the candidate's loss to high voter turnout.

    In a memo sent to journalists as polls closed, Nixon's campaign team accused Cuomo's campaign of overseeing an "unconscionable influx in spending" that resulted in an "extremely high" turnout "throughout the state," according to The Hill.

    "This is likely due to two factors: tens of millions of dollars in advertisements from Andrew Cuomo pushing voters to the polls, and a desire on the part of prime Democratic voters to send a message to [President Donald Trump] for the first time since his election," the campaign team said.

    In the memo Nixon's team also blamed fewer polling hours in upstate New York, where her team said Nixon had polled better than in New York City, for the landslide loss.

    They also cited reports of voting problems in New York City neighborhoods, where they said Nixon had polled better than anywhere else as having conributed to her loss.

    The message from Nixon's campaign team stood in stark contrast to the candidate's own statements, celebrating the campaign as a success, despite her loss.

    "This isn't just a symbolic victory," she said. "This campaign forced the governor to make concrete commitments that will change the lives of people across the state."

    The actor-turned-politician appeared to take credit for Cuomo's announcement in April that the state Senate's Independent Democratic Conference, which she described as "the group of breakaway corporate Democrats who handed the State Senate to the Republicans," had agreed to disband.

    "For 7.5 years, the Governor said he had no power to disband the IDC...," Nixon wrote. "Then, 2 weeks into our campaign, he miraculously disbanded them.

    "Last year, the governor opposed recreational marijuana," Nixon noted. "We came out strongly in favor of legalizing it as a matter of racial justice and the next day, the governor declared that 'the facts on marijuana have changed.'"

    Nixon also championed her campaign's focus on calling for improvements to New York City's subway system, stating: "We made the crisis in the subway a cornerstone of our campaign. Now, everyone in New York understands that the governor controls the subway, and it's the governor's responsibility to fix it."

    Nixon also noted that after her team released its climate justice plan in the Rockaways, the governor "reversed himself and halted construction of a pipeline that would've devastated that community's water and health. The list goes on and on."

    The former Sex and the City star said that while some people had called the chain of events the "Cynthia effect," she called it "what happens when we hold our leaders accountable."

    "This is more than just a campaign—this is a movement," Nixon said. "The movement we're building isn't just about one candidate, or one election. It's about offering a vision of the way things COULD work, if only we have the leadership and the political courage to make it a reality."

    Nixon called on the "generation coming of age in Obama's and Trump's America" to change the country "and for the first time in our history, create a nation that finally belongs to all of us.

    "We started something here in New York, and it doesn't end today. This is just the beginning. And I know that together, we will win this fight," Nixon said.

    She did not appear to have addressed the comments of her campaign team about high voter turnout contributing to her loss.

    While Nixon appeared to concede the Democratic nomination to Cuomo, her campaign is not officially over.

    She still has the backing of the state's liberal Working Families Party, which secures her a spot on the ballot in November, unless she makes efforts to remove herself.

    Cynthia Nixon Campaign Blames 'Extremely High Turnout' for Election Loss to Andrew Cuomo - Newsweek https://apple.news/AecShT2-RRDiXWdGzBUY5lA
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2018
  4. Frank Underwood

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    Not surprisingly, they've taken the "high voter turnout" excuse from her campaign team out of context. What they're saying is that Cuomo outspent her so massively that he was better able to get voters to turn out in support of him. This, of course, is largely due to the advertisements he was able to buy. Because Nixon is principled and didn't take corporate money, she didn't have that luxury. If anything, it's proof of the influence of corporate donations. Cuomo is also known for halting an investigation into the Harvey Weinstein case after he received a $25,000 donation from Weinstein's lawyer. And then there was that mailer from his former aide that falsely accused Nixon of anti-semitism. Cuomo is plagued by corruption.

    Voter suppression is also a huge problem in New York. Not only do you have to register 11 months in advance to vote in the Democratic primaries, many voters have been purged from the rolls. For a party that's vigorously gone after Trump and Russia because they claim to care about election integrity, they sure as hell aren't willing to fix the mess in their own backyard.

    Democrats need to fix their own voter suppression problem

    (CNN) - Every wing of the Democratic Party is rightfully outraged at voter suppression and disenfranchisement. Onerous voter ID laws, voting roll purges, felon disenfranchisement and more exist, or are springing up in one "red" state after another, with only one real goal -- keeping poor and working people, young people, and disproportionately people of color from voting.

    In the midst of the 2016 presidential primary campaign, the DNC and both the Clinton and Sanders campaigns put aside their differences to jointly sue the Republican administration of Arizona over its shocking "mismanagement" of the election there that effectively denied the vote to legions of people. Thank goodness those things don't happen in "blue" states. Right?

    Shamefully, they do.

    Nowhere is this truer than in the great and solidly blue state of New York. It is no accident that, as confirmed by Politifact, "New York consistently ranks as one of the worst voting turnout states in the nation." In the recent New York primary (which was only for federal offices -- more on that in a minute), Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez scored her surprise victory in the state's 14th Congressional District with voter turnout in that district of an abysmal 12%. Compare that with the City of Chicago and Cook County at roughly 30%; California at over 37%; Montana, 41%; and Idaho at 30%, with the county showing the lowest turnout clocking in at 22% -- almost double the turnout of NY-14. What's the matter with New York?

    One of the ways that New York slams the door in the face of voters is the one-two punch of its closed primaries and its draconian party switch rules. Here's how it works.

    A minority of states, including New York, still cling to party rules that exclude so-called independent voters from participating in the major parties' primaries. While these primaries may have been a step forward decades ago, when they replaced an even more exclusionary nomination process, they are now locking out huge number of Democratic voters. What are the impact of these rules?

    Today in New York, if you are not registered to vote at all, you can register and declare a party affiliation about one month before the primary. If you're registered as an independent, but are so inspired by a candidate like Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez that you want to switch your party registration to Democratic, you'd better be a good planner. To vote in New York's federal Democratic primary -- which was held on June 26, 2018 -- you would have had to have switched your party registration by October 13, 2017.

    That's right. You had to switch your registration more than eight months before the primary.

    And that's the same deadline for the state-level primary being held in September, meaning, again you had to switch registration some 11 months in advance.

    In New York, independents -- those who haven't enrolled in a party -- are the second largest group after Democrats in terms of party registration. (Republicans are effectively the third party in New York.) Who are these independents? Many of them are reliably Democratic voters, donors, and volunteers on campaigns. They are disproportionately young. Nationally, some 44% of millennial voters are registering as independents rather than with a party, yet polls show this age group overwhelmingly self-identifies as Democratically-leaning. Among the millennial generation's independents, African Americans are the most likely to lean Democratic, followed by Latinos.

    Why does the New York Democratic Party insist on locking them out of the primaries and creating a culture of non-participation?

    The answer is simple. These closed primaries allow party bosses to exert control over the elections. That gets us to the issue of the split primary in New York, where state and federal primaries are being held on different days. As a senior Democratic National Committee official quipped to me the other day, there's no reason to separate the primaries other than to decrease voter turnout.

    Purveyors of commercial products spend untold sums to develop product and brand loyalty among the millennial demographic while our party is pushing them away.

    How much bigger would Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's victory have been if young people of all races could have easily enrolled in the Democratic party and been eligible to vote in the primary? And how many more candidates like Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez could be elected? The machine knows the answer and so they suppress the vote. It is so obviously a tool of voter suppression that the national Democratic Unity reform commission - comprised of members picked by Clinton, Sanders and the DNC -- unanimously voted to authorize the DNC to sanction the New York Democratic Party.

    Some inside the Democratic Party retort that only someone who signs up for the donkey-emblazoned membership card should be allowed to vote in the primaries even if it means young people and disproportionately young people of color are locked out. They ignore how strikingly similar this argument is to those Republicans use to justify onerous voter ID laws.

    Incredibly, the fix is easy. There is no statutory change needed in New York to open up the Democratic primaries to independents. According to testimony from New York election officials, the New York Democratic Party can change the practice by simply asking that it be done. But just like red state disenfranchisers, machine politicians use voter suppression to stay in power. The same political cowardice that motivates Republicans who want a rigged election process motivates these antiquated rules in New York -- fear that in a fair fight the voters will choose someone else.

    But the onerous registration process and split primaries are not the only tool of voter suppression and disenfranchisement that New York uses. The New York City Board of Elections, for instance, admitted that it illegally purged over 200,000 names from its voter rolls during litigation with the United States Justice Department and others.

    The same is true of the embarrassingly early party switch deadline -- which is by far the longest in the country. There are policies designed by those who don't want to build and expand the Democratic Party but rather to control it and make it less responsive to its base and the needs of voters.

    Voter suppression has a long and ugly history in America and Democrats of all stripes need to fight it. It is hard to credibly combat Republicans' despicable voter suppression efforts when millions are effectively denied the ballot in the Empire State. It's time to get our own house in order so we have the moral authority to protect the voting rights of people everywhere.

    Source: https://www.cnn.com/2018/07/19/opinions/democrats-need-reform-new-york-primary-weaver/index.html

     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2018
  5. Frank Underwood

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    Also, it sounds like Nixon pushed Cuomo to the left on a few issues by running against him. That alone is why progressives should continue to run against corporate Dems.
     
  6. SueEllenRules!

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    Andrew Cuomo cruises to easy win over Cynthia Nixon in New York gubernatorial primary

    ALBANY, N.Y. – Gov. Andrew Cuomo cruised to a win Thursday in the Democratic primary for New York governor, easily warding off a challenge from actor and activist Cynthia Nixon as she tried to position herself as a more-progressive alternative.

    Cuomo, an incumbent in his second term, had 65 percent of the vote to Nixon's 35 percent with 85 percent of the districts reporting.

    The Associated Press called the race for Cuomo at around 9:30 p.m. EDT, a half-hour after polls closed.

    Cuomo’s big victory allows him to continue his bid for a third term and sets up a November battle with Marc Molinaro, the Republican nominee for governor.

    The race between Cuomo and Nixon, the actor and activist best known for her starring role in "Sex and the City," headlined New York's state and local primary elections, which were moved to Thursday to avoid conflicts with Rosh Hashanah and Sept. 11.

    It was a clean sweep for Cuomo's ticket: His running-mate, Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul, also won in her primary fight against New York City Councilman Jumaane Williams, as did Letitia James, Cuomo's preferred pick for attorney general.

    The governor did not attend the Democratic Party's primary celebration in Manhattan, instead choosing to watch the results come in privately with family and friends in Albany, according to his campaign.

    Nor did he choose to issue a statement marking his victory, with his campaign simply tweeting out a photo of him, Hochul and James with a four-work message: "Thank you New York."

    Nixon gave an impassioned concession speech, congratulating Cuomo but taking credit for pushing him to the left on supporting marijuana legalization and disbanding a group of rogue Senate Democrats who once partnered with the GOP.

    "While the result tonight wasn’t what we had hoped for, I’m not discouraged," Nixon said. "I’m inspired and I hope you are, too, because before even a single vote was cast in this election, we had already won."

    Cuomo ran on a record he says positions himself as a national progressive leader and a leading opponent of President Donald Trump, who Cuomo has taken to criticizing at campaign and government events across the state.

    Through a series of television advertisements throughout the state, Cuomo touted his successful push for same-sex marriage in 2011 and subsequent efforts to raise the minimum wage and implement a paid-family-leave program.

    Nixon, who trailed Cuomo by 41 percentage points in a poll released Monday by Siena College, challenged Cuomo from his left, pointing to the more moderate or fiscally conservative positions he’s held during his term in office.

    The candidates cast their ballots Thursday morning – Nixon in her home borough of Manhattan; Cuomo in the Westchester County town of New Castle, where he lives.

    "I believe that my administration has started a very important, positive and progressive agenda," Cuomo told reporters after casting his ballot.

    "I want to continue doing it."

    In an interview Thursday on public radio's "Capitol Pressroom," Nixon said her candidacy was part of a national progressive movement spurred in part by the rise of Trump.

    "I think this is a movement to make sure that the Democratic Party is not just a kinder, gentler, more-diverse version of the Republican Party," Nixon said.

    "People do not show up when we're not clear on who we are and what we fight for."

    The Cuomo-Nixon race was one of three statewide, Democratic primary battles on the ballot Thursday, and it was a clean sweep for Cuomo's primary ticket.

    James, the New York City public advocate, won a four-way race for attorney general, while Hochul was leading Williams by six percentage points with 85 percent of election districts reporting.

    Both James and Hochul were endorsed by Cuomo. AP called the race for Hochul at 11 p.m.

    Under New York election law, candidates for governor and lieutenant governor run in separate primaries with the winners joined together as a ticket in November.

    Reports from throughout the state suggested voter turnout was far stronger than it was in 2014, when just 10 percent of enrolled Democrats turned out to vote in the primary between Cuomo and Zephyr Teachout.

    In Monroe County, for example, turnout was at 22 percent as of 8 p.m., according to the county Board of Elections. In 2014, turnout was about 9 percent after all ballots were counted.

    Cuomo left nothing to chance this year, when insurgent progressives have scored upsets in several races nationwide, including congressional primaries in New York City’s outer boroughs and in Massachusetts.

    A prodigious campaign fundraiser, Cuomo’s campaign spent $21.4 million from mid-January through early September, blanketing the television airwaves with advertisements touting his record, including the passage of same-sex marriage, a higher minimum wage and tougher gun-control laws.

    Nixon spent less than 10 percent of that, spending about $2 million over the same time period.

    New York has a split primary system for federal and state elections, meaning contested congressional primaries were already decided in June.

    As they cast their ballots in the morning, the candidates urged primary voters to get to the polls.

    "We've been seeing in elections not a lot of people turning out, and that is just bad for democracy," Cuomo said.

    "It only works if you come out and you participate."

    Cuomo will now face Molinaro, the Dutchess County executive, in the fall along with at least three third-party candidates.

    Nixon could also choose to continue running in the fall on the Working Families Party line if she so chooses. The left-leaning party picked Nixon as its candidate earlier this year.

    She wasn't willing to entertain the question Thursday morning.

    "This is not a question for today," Nixon said during the radio interview.

    https://www.usatoday.com/amp/1297679002
     
  7. Frank Underwood

    Frank Underwood Soap Chat TV Fanatic

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    The hypocrisy of Dems who scream about Russian interference, yet turn a blind eye when Dems meddle in primaries and purge voters from the rolls, never ceases to amaze me.

    It's the same thing when it comes to corruption. They scream about how corrupt Trump is, yet they (the moderates) support their own batch of corrupt Dems. We're told that progressives don't define the party, yet Hillary Clinton and Andrew Cuomo are two examples of corrupt center-right Dems who disingenuously call themselves progressives. In reality, both were pushed to the left by primary challengers in an effort to shore up the progressive vote. What's also interesting is that Hillary supporters said that anybody who supported Bernie or Trump instead of Hillary was sexist. Funny how they don't consider it sexist to support Cuomo over Nixon. I've never known a bigger group of disingenuous hypocrites in my life.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2018 at 12:38 PM
  8. Angela Channing

    Angela Channing Soap Chat Warrior

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    It's a bit harsh to refer to her showing in the vote as being a vanity project because it was so much more than that. Ms Nixon secured herself a platform and international media attention to promote her views and some voters will have been persuaded by her politics. Even if she only got 1 vote, she still got a chance to promote her politics to a large audience.

    People on the left need to play the long game. America, which is a rabid right-wing society by my standards, isn't going to turn socialist overnight. Years ago it would have been inconceivable that someone promoting left-wing views would get as much as a third of the electorate to support them so in that context she did pretty well.

    I see this result as steady progress, a small step in the right direction that one day the USA will become a fairer, more a equal and more a socialist society.
     
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  9. Snarky's Ghost

    Snarky's Ghost Soap Chat Oracle

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    You're correct, of course. But this is essentially all you ever post.
     
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  10. Frank Underwood

    Frank Underwood Soap Chat TV Fanatic

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    If you think I'm correct, why does it matter how often I post it? The OP is the only regular contributor here, and his posts are the polar opposite from mine. Thus, it makes sense that my posts would be geared towards him. When I create threads specific to Trump, they tend to get little to no response. And yet I keep getting told how I don't care enough about him.

    I can't make my position any clearer than I already have. I have no tolerance for corrupt corporate war mongers, regardless of what party they're from. The same goes for hypocrites. If conservatives still posted here like they did during the Bush years, my posts would obviously be criticizing their defense of Trump and the GOP. Not only that, but my posts should be self-explanatory as to how I feel about Trump and the GOP. When I call out the bipartisan support their policies receive, that alone should tell you how I feel about their governing.
     
  11. Frank Underwood

    Frank Underwood Soap Chat TV Fanatic

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    I hope that happens, but it's not what the OP wants. He literally called millennials who want a living wage, universal healthcare, and tuition free college "generation snowflake."

    Sadly, most of the Democratic Party's elite members share his opinion. That's why it's becoming increasingly difficult to distinguish the liberals from the conservatives.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2018 at 4:18 PM
  12. Angela Channing

    Angela Channing Soap Chat Warrior

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    I'm still of the view that a conservative leaning Democrat is still a infinitely better option than a Republican.
     
  13. Frank Underwood

    Frank Underwood Soap Chat TV Fanatic

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    Many people feel that way. I believe it's the conservative leaning Democrats who help make Republican victories possible. It's like choosing between Diet Pepsi and Pepsi.

    Also, many people suffered under Obama and Clinton just as they did Bush and Trump. And I just can't bring myself to vote for anybody who is an advocate for needless war.
     
  14. Snarky's Ghost

    Snarky's Ghost Soap Chat Oracle

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    And there ya go....
     
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  15. Frank Underwood

    Frank Underwood Soap Chat TV Fanatic

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    I still don't get your point. When an article is posted calling a progressive candidate's run a "vanity project" and celebrates the corrupt politician's win, am I supposed to stay silent?

    Like I said, there are no longer any conservative members here challenging my views. Instead, I find myself going up against moderate Dems whom I also vehemently disagree with.

    But I suppose if I want to hear a variety of opinions, I should head over to the Dynasty forum to get your thoughts on seasons 1, 2, and 9 vs. the rest, as well as the static acting directive.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2018 at 6:53 PM
  16. Snarky's Ghost

    Snarky's Ghost Soap Chat Oracle

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    And there ya go...
    The very fact that you pretend not to know the difference reveals you know the difference.

    The problem is not that you frequently express the same viewpoints, it's context -- the context that you really do just say one thing, and seem unconcerned (or not-so-subtly-vengefully-gleeful) that Trump is actually the person in the White House.

    Now do you think Hillary, the DNC or the flaws of DYNASTY are also more important than our orange, gaseous wonder on Pennsylvania Avenue?
     
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  17. Frank Underwood

    Frank Underwood Soap Chat TV Fanatic

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    I think Hillary and the DNC helped put that orange, gaseous wonder on Pennsylvania Avenue through the Pied Piper Strategy, primary rigging, neoliberal policies, and hubris.

    Nobody seems interested in how we got Trump, they only care that he's there. Everybody here acts like we must support Democrats at any cost, even as I point out that many of them support the worst of Trump's policies and nominees. Of course I want him gone. I've made posts attacking his tax bill scam, his inhumane immigration policy, his healthcare scam, the illegal wars he's engaged in, the bloated military budget, the social programs he's cut, and his extended warrantless surveillance program. But somehow, that's not good enough.

    The context of my posts in this thread was specifically about how New York Dems make voting difficult through strict registration rules and throwing people off of the voter rolls. I'd say that's relevant as the establishment congratulates Cuomo's win over Nixon. The moderate Dem viewpoint is presented here in spades, but apparently my progressive view is somehow overkill. I guess I should focus my attention solely on Trump and pretend that the Democrats aren't corporatist war monger primary cheats who helped make his presidency a reality.

    I don't know how someone as insightful as you can read my posts and come to the conclusion that I'm unconcerned (or worse, "gleeful") that Trump is president. Your premise seems to be that, in order to prove I loathe Trump, I must only talk about his sins and nobody else's. But unlike you, I see Trump as the symptom of our problems and not the source. You get rid of Trump, and you'll still have two corporate-backed war mongers vying for his job. I'd prefer to see significant reforms so that someone decent, ethical, and diplomatic could take office.

    But you've obviously dug your heels in as far as what you think motivates me, so I'm sure posting this is a waste of time. What can I say, I'm a glutton for punishment.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2018 at 7:36 PM
  18. Snarky's Ghost

    Snarky's Ghost Soap Chat Oracle

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    Trump got in the White House via the electoral college. Now if you can find a way to blame the DNC and Hillary for the Republicans gerrymandering, then okay.

    All of which I've agreed with you about. So your saying that "unlike (me)" you see that if we "get rid of Trump, and (we'll) still have two corporate-backed war mongers vying for his job" is a bit bitchily disingenuous because you know very well I feel the same way, and I've said so.
    So I've "obviously dug (my) heels in as far as what (I) think" your heels are dug in about.

    The truth is that your and SueEllenRules!' frustrations with one another are totally warranted. Mutually.
     
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  19. Frank Underwood

    Frank Underwood Soap Chat TV Fanatic

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    Yes, the electoral college. In states where Hillary didn't campaign. Her support for the TPP didn't play well there. Trump knew that, so guess who became the anti-TPP candidate?

    Chuck Schumer also knew she was bleeding support there, hence his arrogant comment about Dems picking up two moderate Republicans for every blue collar Dem they lost.

    But yeah, I'm sure it all came down to Republican/Russian interference.

    Maybe it was a bit "bitchily disingenuous" of me, but that's how I feel you're being towards me. I'm unconcerned and "gleeful" that Trump is president? Come on now!

    Yeah, pretty much.

    They're warranted in the sense that he's a moderate Democrat and I'm a progressive Independent. Those are two opposing positions, hence our frustration. The only reason we got along in the Bush/Obama years is because I thought what the Democrats promised to do aligned with their actions. The 2016 election changed all that. Sadly, there's no going back.
     
  20. Snarky's Ghost

    Snarky's Ghost Soap Chat Oracle

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    So you're upset she didn't campaign enough.

    But you are gleeful that the DNC's side and Clinton supporters have had to deal with Trump in restitution for what they did to Bernie. In contrast, I've agreed with nearly all of your descriptions of the DNC's sin.

    No, your frustrations with one another (and don't soft-pedal them now, for goodness sake) is that you're both right about each others' knuckleheaded "heel-digging"... and it's gotten pretty nasty much of the time.
     

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