Re-watching the Ewingverse ... alphabetically!

Discussion in 'Knots Landing' started by James from London, Jan 8, 2020.

  1. James from London

    James from London Soap Chat Mega Star

    Message Count:
    3,286
    Trophy Points:
    6,636
    Occupation:
    Actor
    Location:
    Brixton
    Ratings:
    +5,664
    Medals:
    5
    Member Since:
    Time immemorial
    I've always had this silly idea about watching all the episodes in a timey-wimey, non-chronological order, zipping through time and space, zigzagging from era to era and back again, just because -- well, just because, really. I'm not sure how far I'll get before I'm overwhelmed by the sheer utter pointlessness of it all but until then ...

    Abby's Choice (KNOTS, 16 Dec 82) v. Acceptance (DALLAS, 02 Apr 82)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The whole of Abby's Choice is focused on one question and there's a real sense of urgency to it: will Abby agree to donate her kidney to Diana? As Lilimae points out, Abby "has never done an unselfish thing in her life", which makes her response all the more interesting. She is angry, resentful and defiant, but mostly scared -- we've never really seen her like this before. She and Gary haven't been together very long at this point, and neither have Karen and Mack (nor Chip and Diana, come to that). Likewise, the wounds between Gary and Val, and Abby and Karen are still very raw. So the interactions between all of these characters are full of fascinating little nuances. (The instant friendship between Laura and Ciji feels a bit forced in comparison, but the actors make it work.) The shadow of Sid’s death hangs over the whole ep so when the Fairgates get their happy ending, you feel like they've earned it. And Claudia Lonow's great as Diana -- understated and vulnerable and lovely.

    On Acceptance, the characters are mostly divided into different storylines. While Bobby does his action hero thing to help bring Jeff Faraday’s killers to justice, Rebecca disowns Cliff (great scene), JR courts Sue Ellen and Miss Ellie tries touchingly to keep the reality of Jock’s death at bay. Compared to Abby's Choice, it's quite a calm episode even though it's the penultimate one of the season. The Ewings finally come together at the end for an old-fashioned family dinner, but trying to turn the clock back proves too much for Miss Ellie and she finally loses it in the kitchen over Jock. This is the dramatic climax we've been building towards, but despite the emotion, the domestic surroundings mean there’s still something very comforting about it (compared to the cold hospital environment on KNOTS). Like KNOTS, it ends on an optimistic note, as Miss Ellie tells Donna she’s accepted Jock’s death.

    And the winner is ... Abby's Choice.

    Bonus Beats (i.e. the song title in my music collection that bears the closest resemblance to the name of one of these episodes):

     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2020
  2. James from London

    James from London Soap Chat Mega Star

    Message Count:
    3,286
    Trophy Points:
    6,636
    Occupation:
    Actor
    Location:
    Brixton
    Ratings:
    +5,664
    Medals:
    5
    Member Since:
    Time immemorial
    Act of Love (DALLAS, 19 Nov 78) v. Acts of Love (KNOTS, 22 Apr 82)

    It’s harder to say which is the bigger betrayal — Sue Ellen sleeping with JR’s worst enemy or Gary sleeping with one of Val’s best friends. Gary volunteering Val to babysit Abby's kid while they’re off doing the deed probably gives him the edge.

    DALLAS has been building up to Cliff and Sue Ellen’s affair for weeks; KNOTS to Gary and Abby’s for over a year. We join Sue Ellen and Cliff six weeks into their romance. Abby and Gary spend much of this ep standing on the will-they-won’t-they precipice. When they finally jump off, it feels hugely momentous. And it is. Indeed, on both shows Nothing Will Ever Be The Same Again.

    Sue Ellen and Cliff play their dalliance cool and sophisticated. “I’ve always known that however you felt about me, it would never come down to really changing your life,” says Cliff. In contrast, it’s Abby declaring how serious she is about Gary that tips the balance in their relationship from flirtation to something more: “I’ve got feelings invested in this, Gary. I’ve got feelings invested in you and I’m sick and tired of being the wicked woman and the home wrecker … It takes two people to feel like this and I’m real tired of being the only one who admits it.”

    Cliff and Sue Ellen seem like grown-ups here. They are self-aware, have a sense of perspective and can even laugh at themselves a little. It’s not like when they get back together later on and storylines dictate that if they have an impulse, they must immediately act on it.

    While the lovebirds play, the mice are away. JR is partying in Washington with a nameless blonde and Val is stranded in a roadhouse with a loveable ex-prize fighter. She gently declines his advances and ends up waiting tables. Val in full hash-slinging mode is truly impressive.

    Having just watched ‘Acceptance’ (DALLAS Season 4) where the Ewings reminisce about the good old days (“I remember Jock saying how much he loved to have his family together at dinnertime. He always insisted that we be right on time,” recalled Sue Ellen), it’s kind of ironic that four years earlier, a mere fifteen episodes after the series began, Jock was already doing the same thing. “You know, there was a time when we all sat down and enjoyed dinner as a family,” he sighs. “This family’s falling apart!”

    From a visual point of view, DALLAS has yet to settle on its house style, so the camera has greater freedom to roam around (I’m not sure how often we see the living room ceiling at Southfork after this ep) and there’s more space for the characters express themselves too. It’s hard to imagine Sue Ellen delivering a bitchy line like, “You Barneses are disgustingly poor,” as playfully as she does to Cliff here at any other point of the series.

    While Cliff and Sue Ellen quote Lewis Carroll (“Talk to me of other things” “Like cabbages and kings”), Abby goes more nursery-rhymey (“I wish I may, I wish I might, Have the wish I wish tonight”). And there’s something wistfully romantic about both relationships. With the benefit of hindsight, we know that, as much as they might want to, neither Sue Ellen nor Gary are equipped to deal with the consequences of their actions in these eps.

    Both episodes have a subplot. On DALLAS, there’s an endearingly dated work/marriage conflict for Pam to sort through. On KNOTS, Laura visits her estranged husband Richard for the first time since his breakdown — a consequence of her own work/marriage conflict.

    KNOTS ends with Lilimae letting Gary know she knows, while DALLAS concludes with a breathtaking confrontation between JR and Sue Ellen in the Southfork den. With the entire family gazing down at her from their portrait on the wall, Sue Ellen casually suggests to JR that he may not be the father of her unborn child. “I’ve been just as faithful to our marriage vows as you have, darlin’,” she assures him with mock-innocence before adding with a shrug, “Chances are it’s yours.” He strikes her hard across the face before realising just how powerless he is. Even after all these years, it’s still absolutely thrilling.

    And the winner is … Act of Love.

    BONUS BEATS:

     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2020
  3. James from London

    James from London Soap Chat Mega Star

    Message Count:
    3,286
    Trophy Points:
    6,636
    Occupation:
    Actor
    Location:
    Brixton
    Ratings:
    +5,664
    Medals:
    5
    Member Since:
    Time immemorial
    Aftermath (KNOTS, 26 Nov 81) v. Aftermath (DALLAS, 05 Nov 82)

    aka 'The One After Sid Dies' versus 'The One After the Reading of Jock’s Will'

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Karen is not exactly in denial about Sid’s death, but there’s a parallel between her behaviour following his funeral and Miss Ellie’s following Jock’s helicopter crash, in that she does everything she can to avoid facing her grief. Whereas Ellie had the luxury of isolating herself out at Southfork, Karen is out in the world, trying to raise a family and run a business. There’s a rawness about the reaction to Sid’s death that wasn’t there with Jock’s — maybe that’s because they never found Jock’s body, or because DALLAS is just that bit glossier a show. But there’s a corresponding moment between this ep and Acceptance (DALLAS, Season 4) where Karen and Ellie each permit themselves a second to stroke the arm of their late husband’s jacket as it hangs in a closet before quickly bringing the emotional shutters down again.

    Every single beat of this episode of KNOTS rings emotionally true, but it’s the Fairgate kids’ fear and bewilderment as they try to adjust to their new circumstances that is the most heartbreaking. Their storyline is juxtaposed with the Wards’ excitement at the impending arrival of their new baby. Inevitably, the two stories collide as Karen picks up the baby and finally starts to sob. Instinctively, Kenny goes to take the kid from her, only ditzy-but-wise Ginger stops him. “It’s OK,” she whispers. Good for Ginger.

    The atmosphere on DALLAS is less emotional, more ominous. As the battle for control of Ewing Oil commences, metaphorical storm clouds gather, characters find themselves obliged to take sides and everyone predicts the worst: “That will’s gonna be a disaster for all Jock’s sons.” “I just don’t wanna be anywhere near this slugfest JR and Bobby are gonna have.” “I get the distinct impression there’s an army mobilising against me.” A lot of groundwork is done to make this nutty contest seem credible — the why’s and wherefores of dividing up company assets are discussed as is Jock’s reasoning behind setting up what Bobby describes as “a very peculiar situation.”

    Karen and Miss Ellie both admit to being angry at their dead husbands — Karen for the “admirable morality” that helped get Sid killed (“He had to go and do the right thing! Out of his way to help, to do his duty!”), Miss Ellie at Jock for the treatment of Gary in his will. While Karen takes her anger out on Gary when she finds him sitting behind Sid’s desk (Michele Lee doesn’t pull her punches in this scene - those are real blows she’s landing on him), Lucy is also pissed off with her father for disappearing back to his own show so quickly after the will-reading.

    And the winner is … Aftermath (KNOTS)

    BONUS BEATS

     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
  4. Daniel Avery

    Daniel Avery Super Moderator Staff Member

    Message Count:
    3,044
    Trophy Points:
    5,636
    Location:
    Sunny South Florida
    Ratings:
    +5,435
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    June 10, 2000
    So where do episodes like "101 Nights of Anne Matheson" (KL) fit in? Would you categorize it as "One Hundred..."
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. James from London

    James from London Soap Chat Mega Star

    Message Count:
    3,286
    Trophy Points:
    6,636
    Occupation:
    Actor
    Location:
    Brixton
    Ratings:
    +5,664
    Medals:
    5
    Member Since:
    Time immemorial
    Aftershocks (KNOTS, 26 Dec 85) v Alterations (KNOTS, 23 Jan 86)

    It’s kind of a jolt to jump straight from Aftermath (Season 3) to Alterations (Season 7). Only four faces from then are still in the opening credits and no-one’s married to the same person they used to be. Instead of car dealerships and natural childbirth, it’s all exploding satellite stations and assassins on the loose. The women’s hair is more coiffed, their shoulders are bigger and everyone seems just that bit more glam. But there’s still a pleasingly human messiness around the edges, with characters talking over one another, and an unpredictability about their behaviour. Greg Sumner, in particular, has a knack of delivering his most furious lines in a calm and measured way and then suddenly exploding when you least expect it. The scene where he demands Gary give him Empire Valley as if he were a child having a tantrum (“It’s MY land!”) is a particular highlight.

    You never quite know what’s coming next. One minute, you’ve got Gary dissolving into whooping hysterics as he recalls the buzz of blowing up Empire Valley; the next, you’ve got Greg delivering a riveting soliloquy to his dead father’s portrait: “I let you reach back from the grave and manipulate my life … Well, Dad, congratulations, you have hatched a new breed of barbarian, a creature determined to surpass even you in creating his own world.” And in-between, you've got Ben Gibson, all coiled Jimmy Stewart integrity, forever the frustrated truth seeker.

    For all the changes, it feels like the same show at heart. Abby and Karen might be arguing about running a million-dollar resort rather than bookkeeping discrepancies at KLM, but their relationship is fundamentally the same in ’85 as it was in ’81. What Karen said then — “I don’t trust you, Abby. I don’t think I ever will” — still applies.

    Alterations comes only four weeks later, but there’s been a notable loss of momentum. The show now feels kind of rudderless, really for the first time. Long-running plots are being rinsed dry, with the sad tale of Joshua’s death being padded out with tabloid headlines about Lilimae and Cathy’s supposed involvement. Meanwhile, Olivia becomes (almost) the last to know about Abby’s complicity in the twins’ kidnapping. Out of everyone who has been impacted by the stolen babies’ saga, the reactions of a self-righteous, self-involved, not especially bright teenager are the least important or interesting, yet the episode ends up revolving around them.

    The incongruity of rich glamorous people existing in an “ordinary” cut-de-sac is illustrated in a couple of contrasting ways during this ep. While billionaire tycoon Greg being left in charge of Laura’s kids is charming and funny, Cathy helping load the Gibson dishwasher while dressed in full MTV sexy pop star regalia just looks ridiculous.

    Still, there are some juicy future plots bubbling along in the background: Jill becoming Mack's full-time assistant; Sylvia Lean and Peter Hollister secretly plotting to lay claim to the Galveston fortune. And any episode that features Julie Harris having a supermarket freak out can’t be all bad.

    And the winner is … Aftershocks.

    BONUS BEATS



    Call me crazy, but yes I would. So #14 with a Bullet comes in-between Four, No Trump and The Fourth Son, and 1,001 Nights of Anne Matheson between One of a Kind and The One to Blame.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2020
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. James from London

    James from London Soap Chat Mega Star

    Message Count:
    3,286
    Trophy Points:
    6,636
    Occupation:
    Actor
    Location:
    Brixton
    Ratings:
    +5,664
    Medals:
    5
    Member Since:
    Time immemorial
    All Over But the Shouting (KNOTS, 23 Oct 86) v All’s Well (KNOTS, 19 Dec 85)

    All Over But the Shouting is the second alphabetical episode in a row in which Lilimae has a dramatic scene in a supermarket. She and Ben start to panic when Bobby suddenly disappears, but then he turns up in the frozen food aisle in the arms of Jean Hackney, who is wearing a film noir headscarf to show Ben she means business. He gets the message and sacrifices his own integrity to endorse Peter Hollister on live TV the night before the Senate election. Abby, as Ben’s boss and the wife of Peter’s opponent, is furious, but as Peter’s secret lover, takes full credit when he calls to thank her for the endorsement. It’s just so enjoyably knotty.

    All’s Well is Noises Everywhere meets THE SIX MILLION DOLLAR MAN. Juxtaposed with some tensely oppressive scenes in the Gibson house on the afternoon following Joshua’s funeral (including a brilliant one in the kitchen that goes on for ages and is one of my favourites of the entire series) is Gary stumbling upon the futuristic sci-fi world buried under Empire Valley. In so doing, he becomes The Man Who Knew Too Much.

    Greg is in pretty much the same position in both episodes — pushed into a corner, trying to do the right thing while covering his own tracks, and ultimately failing to control the situation. In All Over But the Shouting, he installs Phil Harbert, Karen’s kidnapper, in a fleabag motel and orders him to lay low. In All’s Well, he orders Coblentz to call off the hitman who is gunning for Gary. But neither Phil nor Coblentz is listening. And in each situation, Mack is breathing down his former best friend’s neck, wrongly convinced Greg had Karen kidnapped and wants Gary dead. While Phil goes stir crazy and calls out for pizza, thereby blowing his cover, Gary simply goes crazy and blows up Empire Valley.

    And the winner is ... All’s Well.

    BONUS BEATS

     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2020
  7. Knots Blogger

    Knots Blogger Soap Chat Active Member

    Message Count:
    126
    Trophy Points:
    174
    Location:
    Seattle
    Ratings:
    +132
    Member Since:
    2016
    This is genius.
    I remember as a kid sometimes my brother and I would wanna watch all the Bonds but not necessarily in strict chronological order so once we just went through them alphabetically.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. James from London

    James from London Soap Chat Mega Star

    Message Count:
    3,286
    Trophy Points:
    6,636
    Occupation:
    Actor
    Location:
    Brixton
    Ratings:
    +5,664
    Medals:
    5
    Member Since:
    Time immemorial
    Always on Your Side (KNOTS, 07 Feb 91) v An American Hero (KNOTS, 04 Apr 91)

    Great, a double bill from my least favourite season!

    The opening section of Always on Your Side is a good example of what I don’t love about Season 12. First, we see Karen and Mack trying too hard to impress Jason’s social worker, then Linda and Bob trying too hard to impress Mrs Richfield’s niece, and then Frank and Charlotte trying too hard to impress each other. Not only are the characters trying too hard; the actors are too — they’re all being self-consciously wacky as if they’re in a Broadway comedy about a bunch of zany characters who just don’t realise how adorable they are.

    But as soon as the ep remembers it’s a drama not a sitcom and starts taking itself seriously, it instantly improves. Mack helping Jason abscond from the courthouse, Claudia taking a weirdly intense interest in Meg, Paige just being a haughty bitch — it all works. Special credit goes to Joan van Ark and Ted Shackelford who only appear in one proper scene (Gary and the twins reappear at the end as part of a soppy musical montage), but manage to elevate the silly brain virus story by simply taking the situation seriously and playing it for real.

    An American Hero is much better. It does comedy too — the opening scene has Paige fantasising about what she should have done after walking in on Greg and Linda, and there’s lots of enjoyable office politics at the Sumner Group — but it’s much sharper and wittier, with the laughs arising naturally out of the situation rather than the actors trying to impose them. Jason provides the pathos back at the cul-de-sac by movingly defending his abusive father to the Mackenzies until he simply can’t anymore.

    Both eps do a decent job of depicting Mack as a flawed, reluctant hero in Jason’s storyline rather than as a TV saint, while Kate Whittaker has a refreshingly natural, unforced chemistry with both Steve Brewer and her Uncle Greg — which makes her position in the second ep all the more interesting when Steve tells her that Greg was responsible for destroying his parents.

    And the winner is … An American Hero.

    BONUS BEATS

     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2020
    • Like Like x 1
  9. James from London

    James from London Soap Chat Mega Star

    Message Count:
    3,286
    Trophy Points:
    6,636
    Occupation:
    Actor
    Location:
    Brixton
    Ratings:
    +5,664
    Medals:
    5
    Member Since:
    Time immemorial
    And Away We Go! aka The One In-Between The One Where Tommy Beats Up April and The One Where the Ewings Go to Salzburg (DALLAS, 7 Apr 89)

    JR tricks genial businessman Gustav Hellstrom into believing he’s killed a stuntman in a barroom brawl in order to persuade him to hand over the inside information on Carter Mackay’s European deal. There’s an enjoyable familiarity in seeing JR set him up the way he has countless others throughout the years.

    The nostalgia continues with the return of Afton after nearly five years. She’s presented as an internationally successful singer, yet seems to be at the same level of fame that she was in Season 4, i.e., singing for middle-aged rich people in supper clubs.

    This is also the episode where Bobby and April’s romance begins in earnest. Whereas Bobby’s previous love interests (Pam, Jenna, Tracey Lawton) came laden with all kinds of historical and/or familial baggage, the idea seems to be that April’s free spirit is what attracts him to her. “I like you outrageous. It’s part of your charm,” he tells her in one scene. “You’re so honest!” he marvels in another. But if April is outrageous, it’s in a very watered down, anodyne way. When confronted by something genuinely unusual - a piece of abstract art - April makes fun of it in a smugly conservative way, and Bobby joins in. That seems to be their USP as a couple: their idea of "outrageous" is trading weak sitcom wisecracks.

    ... And Never Brought to Mind aka The One After Lilimae Runs Over Chip Outside the Police Station (KNOTS, 3 Nov 83)

    This one is nonstop action: Abby walks out on Gary. Gary sires Val’s twins. Chip slips into a coma. Lilimae is arrested. Karen bitches about Gary to her new pal Greg Sumner (“He doesn’t mean any harm — it’s only that in his wake, people lose their jobs, their marriages and their lives and he always feels guilty, but it’s never his fault”) before abdicating from her role as cul-de-sac matriarch when Val asks for help with Lilimae's disappearance (“I just don’t have anything left”). Diana rejects Karen. Karen rejects Laura. There are no certainties, there is no terra firma. And it’s only the sixth episode of the season! There’s so much going on and yet the characters are given enough space in which to exist that it still feels like they are driving the plot rather than the other way around.

    And the winner is ... ... And Never Brought to Mind.

    BONUS BEATS:

     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. James from London

    James from London Soap Chat Mega Star

    Message Count:
    3,286
    Trophy Points:
    6,636
    Occupation:
    Actor
    Location:
    Brixton
    Ratings:
    +5,664
    Medals:
    5
    Member Since:
    Time immemorial
    And Teddy Makes Three (KNOTS, 13 Jan 83) v And the Walls Came Tumbling Down (KNOTS, 02 Jan 92)

    Both episodes feature a clingy ex stirring up trouble. In ’83, it's Karen’s first boyfriend Teddy Becker declaring his love for her just as Mack is about to propose. In ’92, Pierce’s old flame Victoria Broyard sashays around town, telling everyone who'll listen about his shady past.

    And Teddy ... has a large seam of humour running through it, mostly stemming from Karen’s underwhelming response when Mack asks her to marry him (“Probably,” she shrugs) and his subsequent antagonism towards Teddy. The humour in And the Walls ... is relegated to one charming scene where Kate asks Greg for sex advice and he squirms with embarrassment. (Elsewhere in the same ep, Mack once again accuses Greg of something he hasn’t done — in this case, snatching Meg.)

    These eps feature KNOTS’ first and last psycho boyfriends — Chip Roberts and Pierce Lawton. While Chip will eventually murder his pregnant girlfriend and dump her body in the ocean (Ciji timidly refuses to have an abortion in this ep), Paige is disturbed to hear that Pierce drowned his pregnant girlfriend in the ocean ten years earlier.

    In ’83, eager-to-impress hustler Chip insists on carrying Karen’s shopping. Nine years later, another eager-to-impress hustler, Alex Barth, insists on doing the same thing. And just as Richard and Laura argue in front of Ciji, Gary and Val fight in front of Kate.

    Both eps also feature a business venture that started off in good faith but has now descended into arguments and charges of betrayal. In ’83, Kenny accuses Gary of pushing him out of their record deal with Ciji. In ’92, Gary is the one left behind when Joseph bails out of Tidal Energy just as it’s about to go under. Kenny ends up without a job and it looks like Gary will end up without a ranch. In each case, there is a ruthless puppet master secretly pulling the strings: Abby in '83, Greg in '92.

    And the winner is … they're both great, but ... And the Walls Came Tumbling Down.

    BONUS BEATS:

     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. James from London

    James from London Soap Chat Mega Star

    Message Count:
    3,286
    Trophy Points:
    6,636
    Occupation:
    Actor
    Location:
    Brixton
    Ratings:
    +5,664
    Medals:
    5
    Member Since:
    Time immemorial
    Anniversary Waltz (DALLAS, 22 Jan 88) v Another Modest Proposal (KNOTS, 21 Jan 88)

    While Miss Ellie throws Clayton a surprise anniversary party at Southfork, Jill Bennett throws a surprise birthday party for Gary at Lotus Point. (These episodes originally aired on consecutive days, which means that Ellie married her second husband the day after her favourite son's birthday.) Both end badly, with Bobby attempting to drown JR in the pool and Gary missing a second party organised by Val and the twins. The latter leads to a fantastically bitter argument between Gary and Val over which of them is the flakiest. (“You’re the most undependable person that I’ve ever known!” “This is the uncleanest breakup in the history of marriage!”)

    This episode of KNOTS also includes the early stages of two storylines which will have ramifications for years to come: Greg and Paige’s relationship and the Mackenzies’ adoption of Meg. The two stories intersect as Paige is the only one who knows that Greg hasn’t really left town when he asks Karen and Mack to look after Meg.

    Less interesting is Abby playing the other woman in Charles and Judith Scott’s marriage. Michael York delivers his many declarations of love to Abby with a kind of “inverted commas” irony, as if he were warming up to his role in Austin Powers, whereas Donna Mills plays the whole relationship with total sincerity. The two performances don’t quite match up, making it hard to believe that, of all men, this is the one who got under Abby’s skin.

    Kimberly Cryder and JR’s affair on DALLAS is much more fun. There’s a fab scene where she marches his office and demands he leaves Sue Ellen immediately. He gets rough, grabbing her by her hair and telling her she can’t twist him around her finger the way she does her father and husband, before kissing her hard. This gets her all excited, but then he walks out abruptly, leaving her high and dry. Five screen minutes later, Bobby’s holding his head under the water, calling him a son of a bitch and telling him he doesn’t deserve to live.

    And the winner is … Anniversary Waltz

    BONUS BEATS:

     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2020 at 12:23 PM
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Jimmy Todd

    Jimmy Todd Soap Chat Well-Known Member

    Message Count:
    685
    Trophy Points:
    480
    Location:
    United States
    Ratings:
    +1,070
    Member Since:
    2019
    That was always the thing about the Abby Charles plot. It never seemed true that this is the ONE who stole Abby Lee's heart. When Gary first meets him and says incredulously, "That's Charles!?!" I was in complete agreement.
    I couldn't wait for Charles to get his comeuppance from Abby, and when he did, all I could think was, "She let you off way too easy."
     

Share This Page