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Headline: The death of George Floyd, and the frustration that nothing ever changes

Discussion in 'Headline News' started by Michael Torrance, May 28, 2020.

  1. Michael Torrance

    Michael Torrance Soap Chat Star

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    The death of George Floyd, and the frustration that nothing ever changes

    https://www.startribune.com/the-dea...stration-that-nothing-ever-changes/570815442/


    Don’t know what it is about warm weather that seems, more so than other seasons, to pull always-present racial tensions to the fore — probably nothing, probably just a perception — but recent high-profile events are conglomerating in such a way as to portend a long, hot summer. “Hot” being a metaphor. And not just in Minneapolis, but across the nation.

    Start with the death of Ahmaud Arbery in Georgia. Arbery, 25, was jogging in a suburban neighborhood near his home and was shot dead after being pursued, for the purpose of interrogation, by two white men who told police they thought he was a burglar.

    Then there was the incident just Monday morning in New York’s Central Park, in which a white woman walking her dog called the cops on a black bird-watcher who had asked her to leash the animal as required by law. She told him: “I’m going to tell them there’s an African-American man threatening my life.”

    Before that, the man, apparently sensing trouble, had began recording with his phone. A minute-long video he posted on Facebook reveals two people speaking in clipped, strained voices, as if lacking access to the full capacity of their lungs, as tends to happen instead of shouting when otherwise peaceable people find themselves in the middle of a confrontation. The video doesn’t show how things started. But if you watch it, you’ll find it difficult to place your sympathies with the white woman.

    She, at least, later apologized and tried to explain her motivations, which seems helpful, and was fired from her unrelated job, which does not.
    The Central Park dispute barely had time to percolate Monday before the news turned back to the truly tragic, the death of a handcuffed black man in south Minneapolis who had been held face down to the pavement for more than five minutes with a police officer’s knee on his neck.

    We don’t know everything that happened near 38th Street and Chicago Avenue on Monday evening before George Floyd was on the ground. But because there’s video, we have a reasonable sense of what happened afterward. The officer, identified as Derek Chauvin, kneeled on his suspect’s neck for more than five minutes. Floyd, unable to move, begged, “please, please, please, I can’t breathe.” He begged, “Mama.” Bystanders urged the officer to let up. The stoic officer persisted. And Floyd fell silent.

    Then came the protests. By Tuesday evening, thousands of people had filled the streets, and some clashed with police officers. One side deployed rocks; the other, tear gas and rubber bullets. This degree of tension even though the four Minneapolis officers involved in Floyd’s arrest had been quickly fired and state and federal investigations had been initiated. Even the relative urgency of these actions wasn’t sufficient.

    The situation in Minneapolis might be described as Eric-Garner-meets-Ferguson. It’s unfortunate that one can use that kind of shorthand and be understood by most everyone. It also must be remembered, though, that shorthand simplifies.

    There are several videos circulating online that were taken during Tuesday evening’s march. Even as a whole, they don’t make clear how the march turned violent. Perhaps there were agitators who added an aggressive element to an otherwise peaceful protest. Perhaps there was a lack of restraint by the Police Department, either in its strategy for managing the circumstances or in individual officers’ interpretation of it. All of the above, one suspects.

    All of the above. But above all, it’s hard to ignore the central frustration: that nothing ever changes. From Jamar Clark to Philando Castile to now, there’s a complicated but unacceptable through line in recent policing history.

    Things do change, of course — incrementally. But such progress just can’t compete for public attention with high-profile events.

    End racism? Stop killing black people? Of course. There’s nothing to dispute. Equally important to progress are less-encompassing goals that can be defined, met and documented.

    What might that look like?

    For a police department, it starts with accountability within the ranks. It doesn’t take a citizen’s death to raise questions about police officer misconduct. Lesser abuses occur, complaints are filed and sometimes officers are fired. And then — at least half the time, it appears — they’re reinstated.

    This happens in part because the state requires local governments to submit to binding arbitration in disciplinary actions. So one piece of progress would be to revisit that law. Another would be for departments — through training, peer pressure or whatever means — to change their cultures so that rogue behavior is unacceptable. That would be demonstrated by a sheer drop in the number of complaints.

    Because there are more good cops than bad cops — you know this is true — police officers as much as citizens, and police unions as much as police officers, have reason to push for this kind of change. And they know that’s true, even if they see ways it seems disadvantageous.

    And for the rest of us, who just want to live without complicity in racism and brutality?

    Protests are an entirely valid way to bring pressure for change, but they don’t work if people agitate for a few days then go on with their lives. They don’t work, either, if escalated until others grow weary of the disruption and turn away from the cause.

    They don’t work unless paired with intellectual engagement. They don’t work, ultimately, without attention to the ballot box.

    Housing, education, jobs, sentencing — these are just a few subjects in addition to policing that offer opportunities for documentable progress.

    That doesn’t feel as satisfying as calling out overt bigotry, does it? Not as satisfying as seeing someone sent to prison. Yet it will do more to address the subtler forms of inequality that, despite appearances, prevail today.

    David Banks is at David.Banks@startribune.com.
     
  2. Angela Channing

    Angela Channing World Cup of Soaps Moderator EXP: 21 Years

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    And to anyone who tries to dilute the Black Lives Matter message by saying "all lives matter"...

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. Snarky's Ghost

    Snarky's Ghost Soap Chat Oracle EXP: 19 Years

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    Even the cop's name is "Chauvin."
     
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  4. Zable

    Zable Soap Chat Dream Maker EXP: 3 Years

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    I see what you both @Angela Channing @Snarky's Ghost did there. :D

    Oh, that sore and weary land. When will humans learn? Change begins with the self.

    What have we not learnt? How to stop being activists and warriors for a (just) cause, forever warring?
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2020
  5. Sarah

    Sarah Super Moderator EXP: 21 Years Staff Member

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    Donald Trump has been issued with a Twitter warning after posting about the violence in Minneapolis:

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-52846679

    Twitter has hidden one of President Donald Trump's tweets from his profile, saying it violates rules about glorifying violence.

    But instead of being deleted, it has been replaced with a warning and can be viewed by clicking on it.

    The warning says "Twitter has determined that it may be in the public's interest for the Tweet to remain accessible."

    It is the latest in an escalating row between Twitter and the White House.

    Mr Trump was tweeting about the US city of Minneapolis, which has seen consecutive nights of protests following the death of a black man in police custody.

    The president said he would "send in the National Guard", and followed that up with a warning that "when the looting starts, the shooting starts."

    That second tweet was hidden by Twitter for "glorifying violence".

    Twitter's policy of adding a warning to, rather than deleting, tweets that break its rules when it comes to major public figures was announced in mid-2019. But the social network has never used it on Mr Trump - nor deleted any of his tweets before.

    The same post remains unaltered on Facebook, without any warning attached.

    :eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:
     
  6. Angela Channing

    Angela Channing World Cup of Soaps Moderator EXP: 21 Years

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    Stop talking in riddles, what is it that you think I did there?

    We still haven't learnt that black lives matter just as much as the lives of other people. People will stop being activists against police discrimination and brutality towards black people when the authorities take adequate action to stamp it out.
     
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  7. Frank Underwood

    Frank Underwood Soap Chat Enthusiast EXP: 19 Years

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    JFK summed it up best when he said "Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable."

    Unfortunately, black people predominantly supported Joe Biden in the primaries, and he staunchly supports the authoritarian police state that is the source of the problem.

    Not that Trump is any better, of course. He just wants the violence to escalate. Still, Biden's attainment of the black vote is at odds with his record on issues that affect them.

     
    Last edited: May 29, 2020
  8. Zable

    Zable Soap Chat Dream Maker EXP: 3 Years

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    That's because Mark Zuckerberg doesn't believe that social media platforms should be in the business of policing and censoring the messages that folk post online. He disapproves of Twitter's fact-checking move on Trump.

    TYT feels Zuckerman thinks it's very good business for FB users to be at odds with each other because that divisiveness encourages greater use of the platform.



    Actually, the owners (ie, the tech companies) of US social media platforms such as FB, Twitter & Google enjoy federal law protections known as Section 230: they can't be sued for most messages, photos and videos posted on & shared among them. Twitter didn't have to introduce warning/fact-checking labels but chose to, taking numerous complaints to heart.

    As for Trump, he recently dredged up in tweets the long-time-ago debunked conspiracy theory that Joe Scarborough, when a congressman, had had an affair with a young married woman, Lori Klausutis, who worked in his Florida regional office, then killed her and it was covered up. (She was found dead in his office.) Trump said in a hundred different ways that JS should be investigated for this "Cold Case".

    Back in the day, an investigation showed a heart condition had caused Ms Klausutis to faint, and she hit her head against a desk when she did, and died. JS was not in the office when it happened. He denied an affair; denied having anything to do with her death.

    NYT reported Ms Klausutis’s "relatives have said that the president’s evocation of her death and his unfounded insinuation that she had an affair with Mr. Scarborough have caused them deep distress." Her widower begged Jack Dorsey, Twitter's CEO, to remove Trump's tweets after Trump refused. Twitter declined to remove the prez's tweets but said it was working on something.
    https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.usatoday.com/amp/5257828002

    Then came Twitter's decision to stick fact-check labels on the prez's erroneous tweets. Which it did, twice, earlier this week.

    Because Twitter had the temerity to fact-check the POTUS, Trump has hit back with a directive to try and change the Section 230 protections. He claims the social media platforms have an anti-conservative bias.

    Per the Washington Post:

    The order signed Thursday encourages the Federal Communications Commission to rethink the scope of Section 230 and when its liability protections apply. The order also seeks to channel complaints about political bias to the Federal Trade Commission, an agency that the White House has asked to probe whether tech companies’ content-moderation policies are in keeping with their pledges of neutrality.

    The order additionally created a council in cooperation with state attorneys general to probe allegations of censorship based on political views. And it tasked federal agencies with reviewing their spending on social media advertising.


    I doubt Trump will be able to get the protections rescinded.
     
  9. Zable

    Zable Soap Chat Dream Maker EXP: 3 Years

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    Since you began by saying:
    I immediately thought of my George White quote on an FC thread about a building. Which was merely meant to show the similarities within it with those particular lines in Angela's soliloquy, and point to their origins. No more, no less.

    It hadn't escaped me that Ms Wyman had refined the thought to point out that truly it was the land that endured, not the institution as White had said. But it simply wasn't the intention of my post to applaud her for saying that. It didn't cross my mind.

    As well, Snarky posted this:
    I couldn't see another context for Snarky's use of the word "even" except this: White was speaking of the Philip E. Hart Memorial Office building for senators, and many senators have been lawyers by training; and on FC there was lawyer Erickson, whose first name was Philip.

    So yeah, I thought I'd seen -- imagined? --the unspoken that you two were playing off.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2020
  10. Zable

    Zable Soap Chat Dream Maker EXP: 3 Years

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    Trite as it sounds, it does take two to tango.
     
  11. Frank Underwood

    Frank Underwood Soap Chat Enthusiast EXP: 19 Years

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    I'm not sure exactly how you mean that. In the sense that many of them support politicians who support the unchecked powers of the police state, I would agree. Of course, Barack Obama wasn't the savior many of us were hoping for either. Cornell West said "We've tried black faces in high places," but "they too became too accommodated to the militarized nation state."

    “We are Witnessing America as a Failed Social Experiment” - Dr. Cornell West Preaches on the System
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2020
  12. Angela Channing

    Angela Channing World Cup of Soaps Moderator EXP: 21 Years

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    More riddles.

    Let me explain what I meant by my post: BLACK LIVES MATTER.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2020
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  13. Zable

    Zable Soap Chat Dream Maker EXP: 3 Years

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    Protests around the country were largely peaceful as demonstrators marched in the streets fo several cities, but in Atlanta, demonstrators set a police car ablaze, broke windows and tagged doors at CNN's headquarters. One protester climbed on top of the CNN sign and waved a "Black Lives Matter" flag to cheers from the crowd. Protesters chanted, "Quit your jobs". Another group burnt an American flag. ~ The Sydney Morning Herald
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2020
  14. Zable

    Zable Soap Chat Dream Maker EXP: 3 Years

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    8 minutes, 46 seconds and 'inherently dangerous': What's in the criminal complaint in the George Floyd case

    By Grace Hauck, Jordan Culver | USA Today | Updated 7:31 a.m. GMT+08:00 May 30, 2020

    Former Minneapolis Police Department Officer Derek Chauvin on Friday was arrested on charges of third-degree murder and [second-degree] manslaughter in connection to [sic] the death of George Floyd after days of unrest within the city.

    A criminal complaint that references body-worn cameras worn by the four now-former officers involved in the incident sheds some additional light on what happened on Memorial Day in the moments before and after Floyd's death.

    The Hennepin County Attorney's complaint said Chauvin had his knee on Floyd’s neck for 8 minutes and 46 seconds, including two minutes and 53 seconds after Floyd was non-responsive.

    The complaint lines up with what many nationwide have seen in video of the incident and adds context for what other officers at the scene were doing. One officer on the scene expressed worry for Floyd and asked Chauvin twice if Floyd should be rolled onto his side.

    After Floyd became unresponsive, an officer checked for a pulse and said he didn't find one, according to the complaint. Chauvin kept his knee on Floyd's neck for an additional two minutes after that, according to the complaint. The report adds the type of restraint Chauvin used "with a subject in a prone position is inherently dangerous."

    The Minneapolis Police Department allows the use of two types of neck restraints as "non-deadly" force options for officers who have received the proper training. However, the Minnesota Professional Peace Officer Education System said in a statement that the tactics seen in the video "do not appear to reflect the training that students receive."

    According to the complaint's narrative, Officers Thomas Lane and J.A. Kueng arrived on the scene first and found Floyd sitting in a car, with two other people, parked around the corner from Cup Foods, where Floyd allegedly bought merchandise with a counterfeit $20 bill.

    Lane began speaking with Floyd, pulled his gun and pointed it at Floyd’s open window. Lane told Floyd to show his hands, and when Floyd put his hands on the steering wheel, Lane put his gun in his holster.

    Lane ordered Floyd out of the car, then pulled him out of the car and handcuffed him. Floyd "became compliant" and sat on the ground. Lane asked if Floyd was "on anything." When Lane and Officer Kueng stood Floyd up to put him in the squad car, Floyd fell to the ground and said he was claustrophobic.

    That's when Officers Chauvin and Tou Thao arrived in their squad car, according to the complaint.

    Floyd did not voluntarily get in the squad car and "struggled with the officers by intentionally falling down." While standing outside the car, Floyd began saying he couldn’t breathe. Chauvin tried to get Floyd into the car but then pulled Floyd out of the car, and Floyd fell on the ground face down, still handcuffed.

    Kueng held Floyd’s back and Lane held his legs, the document says. Chauvin put his knee "in the area of Mr. Floyd's head and neck," and Floyd began saying that he could not breathe.

    When Lane asked "should we roll him on his side," Chauvin said "no, staying put where we got him." When Lane said he was "worried about excited delirium or whatever," Chauvin said "that’s why we have him on his stomach." After Floyd stopped breathing, Lane said "want to roll him on his side." Kueng checked Floyd's pulse and said he didn’t have one.

    The preliminary autopsy report found "no physical findings that support a diagnosis of traumatic asphyxia or strangulation," according to the document, which suggests Floyd’s existing health conditions – coronary artery disease and hypertensive heart disease – combined with being restrained by police and any "potential intoxicants in his system" contributed to his death.

    Floyd's family already is disputing the county's preliminary findings.

    "We’ve just spoken recently with the district attorney," attorney Ben Crump said at a news conference Friday morning. "We’re going to take custody back of his body, and we’re bringing in Dr. Michael Baden to perform an independent autopsy."

    Crump said the family suspected city authorities of trying to establish a false narrative through the autopsy report.

    "The family does not trust anything coming from the Minneapolis Police Department. How can they?" Crump said.

    Baden is a forensic pathologist known for investigation of high-profile deaths, including that of Jeffrey Epstein. Baden did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
     
  15. Zable

    Zable Soap Chat Dream Maker EXP: 3 Years

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  16. Zable

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  17. Zable

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  18. Emelee

    Emelee Soap Chat Winner EXP: 7 Years

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    The world is full of racists and fascists. It's a structural problem, deeply rooted everywhere. Anyone who can't see that the white guy is privilaged is probably a white guy and has never experienced being on the wrong side.

    The ancient myth that the black man is dangerous is still with us today. It's important to understand the offenders's side to understand how these tragedies can continue to happen. A number of police officers who have killed or used too much violence often say they were scared or even terrified in the situations. That tells me that their racism against the black man is so deeply rooted that it's in their backbone. And that is extremely serious. They have grown up with unreflected and structured racism. Not only them, but probably a majority of us. So when push comes to shove, their basic instinct kicks in: "the black man is dangerous".

    Anyone looking for a quick fix is naive. Anyone thinking it will go away on its own in the future is deluded. Anyone who thinks a change in politics is the answer doesn't realize the problem is much worse than they think.

    But we got to start somewhere, and it has to start with ourself. Reflect on what you really feel and reflect on why you feel this way. What can I do about myself and how I raise my children (if I have any)? Things will never change if we keep insisting that others fix the issues, as though "they" can. It has to start with yourself and those you can form from the start.

    Unfortunately, I have no hope that enough people will reflect on their own thoughts and feelings. Nor do I have any hope that enough parents will take time and effort to form their kids to reflect on social structures and really question them. Then challenge them.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2020
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  19. Zable

    Zable Soap Chat Dream Maker EXP: 3 Years

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  20. Frank Underwood

    Frank Underwood Soap Chat Enthusiast EXP: 19 Years

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    A change in politics may not be the only answer, but it's a good place to start. The more informed you are, the less likely you are to vote for a proponent of the violent police state.

    Unfortunately, even black leadership failed black people. Cornel West wrote an article in 2016 titled "Obama has failed victims of racism and police brutality." Here's the link:
    https://www.theguardian.com/comment...ama-us-racism-police-brutality-failed-victims

    As far as white privilege goes, many affluent white liberals have a prejudiced view of poor whites and assume that they simply aren't taking advantage of their privilege. Unfortunately, discussions about white privilege often lack nuance, and they have an air of condescension to them. I'm not going to pretend that white people aren't less likely to be murdered by the police, but that doesn't mean we experience privilege in every aspect of life. I sympathize greatly with black people, but I'm not a part of the oppressive ruling class that's behind our ills.
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2020

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