2019 Aki Basho.

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Swami, Sep 6, 2019.

  1. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superhero

    Message Count:
    7,739
    Trophy Points:
    4,142
    Occupation:
    Civil Servant
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +7,421
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Injury forces ozeki Takayasu to withdraw from autumn basho
    Details
    Written by Kyodo
    Published: 06 September 2019
    Hits: 22
    [​IMG]


    Ozeki Takayasu will sit out the entire 15 days of the upcoming Autumn Grand Sumo Tournament due to a lingering left elbow injury, his stablemaster Tagonoura said.

    The 29-year-old Japanese-Filipino wrestler injured his elbow at the Nagoya meet in July and withdrew after securing a winning record with an eighth victory. He was diagnosed with a damaged ulnar collateral ligament that will take about a month to heal.

    Takayasu's participation in the Sept. 8-22 meet at Tokyo's Ryogoku Kokugikan was in doubt after he missed the summer promotional tour and the Yokozuna Deliberation Council soken, or supervised practice session, on Aug. 31.

    "I had been thinking about (withdrawing) for some time. The main (reason) is that I'm unable to wrestle in top form. I'll shift mental gears and look ahead to the Kyushu basho," Takayasu said.

    Meanwhile, Tagonoura said, "He hasn't been able to practice, so he has to first get his body condition up to a level where he can wrestle."

    "Other than his left elbow he's doing really well. We decided to think long-term and thought it was best that he not compete," he said.

    If healthy, Takayasu will fight as a "kadoban" ozeki for the third time in his career at the Kyushu meet in November, meaning he is in danger of demotion to the third-highest rank of sekiwake if he does not log a winning record.

    It is the sixth time in his career that Takayasu will miss either part or all of a basho.

    Swami
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  2. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

    Message Count:
    8,002
    Trophy Points:
    3,142
    Location:
    USA
    Ratings:
    +12,001
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    January 25, 2011
    Another "kadoban" ozeki. A good move if Takayasu wasn't up for it. No need to worsen the injury.

    I see Tochinoshi meets Ichinojo in Day 1. I look forward to this basho.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superhero

    Message Count:
    7,739
    Trophy Points:
    4,142
    Occupation:
    Civil Servant
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +7,421
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Tochinoshin usually has the better of Ichinojo, a lot depends on what Ichinojo turns up, the usual lethargic one, or the more aggressive one.

    Swami
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superhero

    Message Count:
    7,739
    Trophy Points:
    4,142
    Occupation:
    Civil Servant
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +7,421
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Aki Day 1: Hakuho suffers opening-day upset
    Details
    Written by Kyodo
    Published: 08 September 2019
    Hits: 20
    [​IMG]


    Starting his first tournament as a Japanese citizen, Hakuho was immediately put on the back foot by top-ranked maegashira Hokutofuji, who has now beaten the record-holding champion twice in seven bouts.

    Hokutofuji locked under Hakuho's left arm and drove the Mongolian off the raised ring with lethal timing, staying low to deny his opponent a belt hold. Hokutofuji, who faces yokozuna Kakuryu on Day 2, earned his sixth kimboshi prize for defeating a grand champion.

    In the final bout of the day at Tokyo's Ryogoku Kokugikan, Kakuryu -- looking for a second straight top-division title -- took down komusubi Endo. Kakuryu held his ground against a solid initial charge and slapped Endo down to claim a textbook win.

    Among the ozeki in competition, Goeido easily pushed out No. 1 Aoiyama, while Tochinoshin was quickly felled by No. 2 Ichinojo.

    Georgian-born Tochinoshin was unable to budge the 224-kilogram Mongolian and was thrown to the clay after slipping on his heavily taped left leg.

    After each withdrawing without a winning record in Nagoya, Goeido and Tochinoshin are both fighting as demotion-threatened "kadoban" ozeki, needing at least eight wins to keep their rank.

    Fellow ozeki Takayasu has pulled out of the entire 15-day meet with a left elbow injury.

    Takakeisho, who is back in action after suffering a right knee injury in his ozeki debut in May, earned a hard-fought victory over No. 3 Daieisho. The sekiwake is seeking promotion straight back to sumo's second-highest rank with 10 or more wins in the tournament.

    He fended off Daieisho's relentless pursuit, with each wrestler landing massive shoves and knocking each other around the ring. Adeptly keeping his balance, Takakeisho finally turned the tables by thrusting Daieisho down as he ran out of gas.

    The other sekiwake, Mitakeumi, took a loss after being quickly driven out by No. 2 Asanoyama. Mitakeumi went for a slap-down, but Asanoyama secured a belt-hold on the initial charge and used it to drive Mitakeumi over the straw.

    Komusubi Abi lost in his first top-division meeting with Tomokaze. Abi launched a flurry of shoves and slaps to push Tomokaze back, but the No. 3 maegashira remained poised and slapped Abi down.

    In the lower ranks, Nagoya's juryo division champion and makuuchi newcomer No. 14 Tsurugisho beat No. 14 Toyonoshima to win in his top-tier debut.

    No. 15 Azumaryu, who is making his first makuuchi appearance in 30 tournaments, also picked up an opening-day win against fellow top-division returnee, No. 15 Ishiura. No. 16 Yutakayama also marked his return with a win.

    Swami
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  5. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

    Message Count:
    8,002
    Trophy Points:
    3,142
    Location:
    USA
    Ratings:
    +12,001
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    January 25, 2011
    I certainly enjoyed Hokutofuji's win over Hakuho. Tochinoshin didn't look well. His knee may never heal correctly to compete at this level.

    I read that Yoshikaze pulled out again and is retiring?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superhero

    Message Count:
    7,739
    Trophy Points:
    4,142
    Occupation:
    Civil Servant
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +7,421
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Yes, I read that somewhere too. Time will tell.

    Tochinoshin looks as if that knee will never heal properly.

    Swami
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superhero

    Message Count:
    7,739
    Trophy Points:
    4,142
    Occupation:
    Civil Servant
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +7,421
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Yokozuna Hakuho withdraws from Autumn Basho with broken finger
    Details
    Written by Kyodo
    Published: 09 September 2019
    Hits: 14
    [​IMG]


    Yokozuna Hakuho has withdrawn from the ongoing 15-day Autumn Grand Sumo Tournament with a broken finger, his stablemaster said, following a shock opening-day loss to rank-and-filer Hokutofuji.

    The 34-year-old yokozuna was aiming to win a record-extending 43rd top-division championship at Tokyo’s Ryogoku Kokugikan but suffered a severe blow when he was forced out of the ring by No. 1 maegashira Hokutofuji on Sunday.

    It was the first time that Hakuho lost to a rank-and-file wrestler on the opening day of a grand tournament since he was promoted to the sport’s highest rank in 2007.

    “It seems his finger had been bent back during his bout with Shodai (on Day 8) of the last tournament (in Nagoya),” his stablemaster Miyagino told reporters Monday.

    “He had been worried about (an injury to his right little finger). He couldn’t use his hand at all (on Sunday). I think he just wanted to fight.”

    Hakuho’s withdrawal — his first since sitting out the entire Summer meet in May and 13th in his career — gives komusubi Abi a win by forfeit on Monday and puts fellow yokozuna Kakuryu in prime position to win a second straight title.

    Just before the tournament kicked off, the Mongolian-born Hakuho acquired Japanese citizenship, a requirement to become a sumo elder and stablemaster after retirement.

    Swami
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  8. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

    Message Count:
    8,002
    Trophy Points:
    3,142
    Location:
    USA
    Ratings:
    +12,001
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    January 25, 2011
    I was a little surprised to see Hakuho exit this early. I guess this will be how he rolls for the next two years or so until he retires as his record is so good even a few missed tourneys will not mean much. BTW, as Abi got the forfeit win does he get a gold star? I assume not.

    Tochinoshin still look bad and I'm starting to think his best days may have been those three or so bashos in 2018. A real shame.

    Enho still seems to amaze in many matches. I'm eager to see him wrestle ozeki and yokozuna.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superhero

    Message Count:
    7,739
    Trophy Points:
    4,142
    Occupation:
    Civil Servant
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +7,421
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    No, no gold star for Abi as he inherited the win by default. I think Tochinoshin should retire rather than face a second demotion.

    Looks like Kakuryu should be the favourite, but you never know!

    Swami
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superhero

    Message Count:
    7,739
    Trophy Points:
    4,142
    Occupation:
    Civil Servant
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +7,421
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Aki Day 3: Kakuryu pulls ahead as Goeido falls
    Details
    Written by Kyodo
    Published: 10 September 2019
    Hits: 17
    [​IMG]


    Grand champion Kakuryu retained his spotless record with a third-straight win at the Autumn Grand Sumo Tournament, while ozeki Goeido suffered his first loss and dropped down the leaderboard.

    All the sport's elite in competition at Tokyo's Ryogoku Kokugikan prevailed on Day 3 of the 15-day meet with the exception of Goeido, who fell to 6-7 in his rivalry with komusubi Endo.

    In the day's last bout, Kakuryu took a few thrusts from No. 1 maegashira Aoiyama but quickly found a gap to slap down the winless Bulgarian. The 34-year-old Mongolian, the July champion, is seeking a second-straight title, and will do so without any competition from fellow yokozuna Hakuho, who pulled out on Day 2 with a broken finger.

    In earlier bouts, Goeido nearly swung Endo (2-1) around and out, but the komusubi recovered and swapped positions with the ozeki before forcing Goeido out to his first loss.

    The other "kadoban" ozeki in danger of losing his rank, Tochinoshin, picked up his first win since May's Summer meet by defeating Hokutofuji. The top-ranked maegashira suffered his second-straight loss since delivering a shock upset to Hakuho on Day 1. After two false starts, Tochinoshin latched onto his opponent's belt and grappled him around into a stalemate before taking charge and steamrolling Hokutofuji off the raised ring.

    Takakeisho defeated No. 2 Asanoyama (2-1) to claim a third win in his fight to regain his ozeki status. The sekiwake delivered a massive shove in the initial charge against Asanoyama, then vaulted back while slapping the maegashira down by the arms and back.

    In the next bout, sekiwake Mitakeumi (2-1) dodged a slap-down attempt from No. 2 Ichinojo (1-2) and capitalized on the chance to force out the off-balance Mongolian behemoth.

    Abi (2-1) emerged the victor in a close brush with No. 3 Daieisho (0-3). The komusubi was taken to the edge by his opponent but managed to slap Daieisho down the moment before his own foot cleared the straw.

    Five wrestlers remain perfect after three days of action in the Japanese capital, including No. 8 Okinoumi, division lightweight No. 11 Enho and No. 15 Azumaryu.

    Azumaryu sealed his third win of the meet with a push-out victory over No. 16 Yutakayama. The 32-year-old Mongolian is making his return to the top division for the first time in 30 tournaments.

    Makuuchi rookie Tsurugisho, fighting in the east No. 14 slot, improved to 2-1 with a win over No. 13 Nishikigi (2-1).

    No. 5 Chiyotairyu, former ozeki and current No. 7 Kotoshogiku, No. 11 Onosho and No. 16 Tochiozan all earned their first wins of the tournament.

    Swami
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  11. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

    Message Count:
    8,002
    Trophy Points:
    3,142
    Location:
    USA
    Ratings:
    +12,001
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    January 25, 2011
    I liked the Goeido vs. Endo match. I wish Endo was more consistent.

    Good to see Tochinoshin win over Hokutofuji. I had major doubts going into that match.

    Agreed, Kakuryu looks solid so far. He's got Ichinojo on Wednesday. Hokutofuji vs Goeido should be interesting as well.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superhero

    Message Count:
    7,739
    Trophy Points:
    4,142
    Occupation:
    Civil Servant
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +7,421
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Takakeisho and Mitakeumi also looking good this time, so Takakeisho should have a good chance of getting the 10 wins he needs to get back to ozeki.

    Swami
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  13. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superhero

    Message Count:
    7,739
    Trophy Points:
    4,142
    Occupation:
    Civil Servant
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +7,421
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Aki Day 4: Kakuryu, Takakeisho and Okinoumi earn 4th wins
    Details
    Written by Kyodo
    Published: 11 September 2019
    Hits: 13
    [​IMG]


    Yokozuna Kakuryu kept his share of the lead at the Autumn Grand Sumo Tournament, defeating rank-and-filer Ichinojo in the day’s final bout at Tokyo’s Ryogoku Kokugikan.

    The Mongolian yokozuna, gunning for his second straight championship, sits in a tie with sekiwake Takakeisho and No. 8 maegashira Okinoumi after the fourth day of the 15-day tournament.

    The only yokozuna remaining in the meet, Kakuryu made quick work of the 224-kg Ichinojo, the heaviest man in the top makuuchi division.

    Among the two ozeki competing, Goeido remains one win behind the leaders, while Tochinoshin suffered his third loss of the tournament.

    A day after suffering his first loss, Goeido (3-1) bounced back to beat No. 1 Hokutofuji (1-3) to stay in contention for his second top division championship.

    In the day’s penultimate bout, Tochinoshin appeared to have won after resisting komusubi Abi’s charge and throwing him down, but the ringside judges overturned the result. After conferring in the ring, the judges determined Tochinoshin illegally grabbed Abi (3-1) by his topknot while sending him to the ground.

    Takakeisho, who was demoted to the sport’s third-highest rank of sekiwake ahead of the meet, easily collected his fourth straight win in his campaign to regain ozeki status. Following the initial clash, the popular sekiwake chased No. 3 maegashira Tomokaze (2-2) out of the ring to secure the win in 2.6 seconds.

    In front of a sell-out crowd, sekiwake Mitakeumi beat Bulgarian No. 1 Aoiyama (0-4) to remain one win behind the leading pack. Komusubi Endo also recorded his third win following another strong display against No. 2 Asanoyama (2-2), the May tournament champion.

    Among the three rank-and-filers who started the day at 3-0, Azumaryu and Enho both suffered their first losses of the meet. No. 15 Azumaryu (3-1), making his return to the top division following a long stint in the lower ranks, was unable to react to the strong shoves from No. 17 Takagenji (1-3). No. 11 Enho (3-1), the division’s lightest wrestler at 98 kg, lost to No. 12 Shohozan (2-2) in an action-packed bout that lasted more than a minute.

    Swami
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  14. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

    Message Count:
    8,002
    Trophy Points:
    3,142
    Location:
    USA
    Ratings:
    +12,001
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    January 25, 2011
    Kakuryu looked solid today and Ichinojo looked injured after their bout.

    A great match between Enho and Shohozan. Shohozan surely did his homework before this match and wasn't having any of Enho's tricks.

    The Endo and Asanoyama match was great as well.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  15. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superhero

    Message Count:
    7,739
    Trophy Points:
    4,142
    Occupation:
    Civil Servant
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +7,421
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Tochinoshin not doing himself any favours with that hair grab, he needs every win he can get.

    Swami
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  16. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superhero

    Message Count:
    7,739
    Trophy Points:
    4,142
    Occupation:
    Civil Servant
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +7,421
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Aki Day 5: Kakuryu handed first defeat; Takakeisho, Okinoumi improve to 5-0
    Details
    Written by Kyodo
    Published: 12 September 2019
    Hits: 11
    [​IMG]


    The sole yokozuna in action at Tokyo's Ryogoku Kokugikan was defeated by the May tournament winner, No. 2 maegashira Asanoyama (3-2), who earned his first kimboshi prize for defeating a grand champion as a rank-and-filer while evening their head-to-head record at one apiece.

    In the final bout of the day, Kakuryu latched onto Asanoyama's belt and attempted an underarm throw. But the maegashira resisted and spun Kakuryu around, moving the off-balance yokozuna to the edge of the ring and over the straw.

    In earlier matches, Takakeisho (5-0) hit the halfway mark on the road to regaining ozeki status with a win against No. 1 Hokutofuji, who took his fourth straight loss since beating Hakuho on opening day. The young sekiwake, who needs 10 wins to return to ozeki, gained the early momentum with a huge hit in the opening clash. He then sidestepped his lunging his opponent before slapping him down, all while nimbly maintaining his footing just inside the edge of the ring.

    Okinoumi also retained his share of the lead with a slap-down win over No. 9 Kotoyuki (2-3). The No. 8 maegashira, a three-time runner-up and former sekiwake seeking his first top-division title, pushed Kotoyuki back at the initial charge, then maneuvered back while slapping his opponent to the sand.

    Among the ozeki, who both require at least eight wins here to keep their position at sumo's second highest rank, Goeido (4-1) deflected a thrusting attack from No. 3 Daieisho (1-4) to stay within reach of the Emperor's Cup.

    Tochinoshin (2-3) bounced back from an unfortunate result on Day 4 by taking down No. 3 Tomokaze (2-3). The pair collided heavily in their first top-division matchup before the Georgian moved to the side and pulled the maegashira down.

    Mitakeumi defeated komusubi Abi (3-2) and improved to 4-1. Abi appeared to have Mitakeumi on the ropes with some stiff arms to the neck and face, but was pushed aside by the sekiwake and thrusted down.

    Endo earned his fourth straight win after pushing out winless No. 1 Aoiyama. Fighting as a komusubi for the first time since last year's Summer meet, Endo dug in low against the big Bulgarian, turning him around and quickly sidling him off the dohyo.

    Among the rank-and-file, No. 6 Myogiryu, No. 10 Meisei, No. 11 Enho and No. 15 Ishiura all churned out victories on Day 5 to stay one win off the pace.

    Before the start of the day's bouts, No. 2 Ichinojo (1-4) pulled out of the tournament with a right shoulder injury he suffered in his match with Kakuryu the previous day. The Mongolian-born former sekiwake is not expected to return for the rest of the 15-day meet, according to his Minato stablemaster.


    Swami
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  17. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

    Message Count:
    8,002
    Trophy Points:
    3,142
    Location:
    USA
    Ratings:
    +12,001
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    January 25, 2011
    It was inevitable that Kakuryu would lose but I hope he bounces back on Friday against Daieisho. Daieisho can pull of upsets at the top tier so I hope Kakuryu is ready.

    Takakeisho seems to be the man of the hour now.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  18. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superhero

    Message Count:
    7,739
    Trophy Points:
    4,142
    Occupation:
    Civil Servant
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +7,421
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Sometimes if Kakuryu falls to an early loss he can go into a tailspin, so this yusho race could still be wide-open.

    Swami
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  19. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superhero

    Message Count:
    7,739
    Trophy Points:
    4,142
    Occupation:
    Civil Servant
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +7,421
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Aki Day 6: Okinoumi sweeps into sole lead
    Details
    Written by Kyodo
    Published: 13 September 2019
    Hits: 9
    [​IMG]


    No. 8 maegashira Okinoumi started the day at Ryogoku Kokugikan with a 5-0 record along with sekiwake Takakeisho. But Takakeisho lost when he was accidently tripped by the referee. Yokozuna Kakuryu (4-2) ended the surprising day when he was shoved out by No. 3 Daieisho (2-4).

    Having lost all four of his previous bouts against Kakuryu, Daieisho doggedly fended off the Mongolian, who is seeking his second straight championship after winning July’s tournament in Nagoya. It was the maegashira’s first career win over a yokozuna.

    Takakeisho, looking for four more wins to regain his ozeki status for November’s Kyushu Basho, lost his footing after the referee got in path. As komusubi Endo (5-1) pressed forward, Takakeisho appeared to step backward onto the edge of the referee’s left foot. When the referee yanked his foot out of the way, the sekiwake’s right foot slipped out from under him and he crashed to his first defeat.

    Moments later, in the match between ozeki Goeido and No. 2 Asanoyama, the same referee gave the wrestlers an extra-wide berth as he shifted his position. In the process, the referee tripped on the straw bales and went tumbling out of the ring. Asanoyama threw Goeido, leaving both wrestlers with 4-2 records.

    Okinoumi earned a solid win over No. 6 Shimanoumi (2-4). The 34-year-old Okinoumi seized his opponent’s right arm on his initial charge. Shimanoumi spun and tried to wriggle free, but Okinoumi lowered his head, charged forward and drove his opponent from the ring.

    Ozeki Tochinoshin (2-4) followed Goeido to the ring and suffered his fourth defeat, getting shoved out by No. 4 Tamawashi (4-2). With a different referee in charge, the Georgian ozeki was originally ruled the winner, but that decision was overturned upon video review.

    Sekiwake Mitakeumi (5-1) won his fifth straight bout, shoving No. 1 Hokutofuji (1-5) straight from the charge with thrusts to the shoulder and neck.

    Among the wrestlers who improved to 5-1 was 98-kg Enho, who proved too pesky for No. 13 Kagayaki (3-3). Kagayaki struggled to keep his balance while pressing forward against the crafty No. 11. As a result, Enho was twice able to scamper backward, escape and attack Kagayaki from the side. As Enho lunged for his right leg, Kagayaki tried to dance away but lost his balance, allowing the smaller wrestler to shove him out.

    Swami
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  20. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

    Message Count:
    8,002
    Trophy Points:
    3,142
    Location:
    USA
    Ratings:
    +12,001
    Medals:
    4
    Member Since:
    January 25, 2011

    You called this right. I hope Kakuryu rebounds or else he'll likely withdraw.

    I looks like a wide open yusho now. Asanoyama, Takakeisho, Okinoumi, and even Goeido could be in the running.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1

Users Who Have Read This Thread (Total: 2)

Share This Page