2018 Nagoya Basho.

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Swami, Jul 8, 2018.

  1. Swami

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    Nagoya Day 1: Kakuryu's bid for 3rd-straight championship off to good start
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 08 July 2018
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    Yokozuna Kakuryu, looking for his third straight championship, was dominating on Sunday, the first day of the Nagoya Grand Sumo Tournament.

    The Mongolian managed to corral livewire komusubi Shohozan and thrust him out in the opening day finale of the 15-day meet at Dolphins Arena. The yokozuna's win was his 13th in 15 career bouts against Shohozan.

    All the big guns, save for ozeki Goeido and sekiwake Ichinojo, joined Kakuryu with first-day wins.

    Yokozuna Hakuho, seeking to extend his record championship haul to 41, needed all his skill to outlast Mongolian compatriot Tamawashi. The komusubi recovered from a seemingly untenable position to grab the yokozuna's belt with both hands.

    Despite having his heels back against the straw bales, Hakuho somehow escaped his opponent's grasp and executed a perfect beltless arm throw.

    Tochinoshin overpowered Ikioi, who won the battle to keep the new ozeki from securing an underarm belt hold, but lost the war as the Georgian used brute force to plow him out.

    "That worked out. I wrestled well and got off to a good start," said Tochinoshin, who took advantage of his opponent's distraction to dominate the bout.

    Ozeki Takayasu, who is coming off injury and needs eight wins to avoid forfeiting his rank, got off to a winning start against former ozeki and current No. 1 maegashira Kotoshogiku. Although Kotoshogiku had the best of the early going, Takayasu was able to anticipate his opponent's moves, get on his flank and haul him down.

    Like Takayasu, Goeido entered the tournament as a "kadoban ozeki" whose status at sumo's second-highest rank is in jeopardy after a losing record in May.

    Goeido was about to throw No. 1 maegashira Shodai from the ring by his belt. But the ozeki's right hand slipped, and he found himself on the edge of the straw with his back to Shodai, who propelled him out with a tap.

    Mitakeumi marked his return as a sekiwake with a comprehensive win, shoving out No. 3 maegashira Abi. The 25-year-old Mitakeumi went 9-6 in May as a komusubi after spending the previous five tournaments as a sekiwake.

    His sekiwake partner, 225-kilogram Mongolian Ichinojo was embarrassed by No. 2 maegashira Chiyonokuni, who took forever to touch the surface with his hand and start action. Ichinojo appeared to fall asleep during the interlude, and the 145-kg Chiyonokuni's charge struck home while the Mongolian was still in his crouch.

    Swami
     
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  2. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    A good first day for most. A nice opening win for Shodai over Goeido. Ichinojo never fails to disappoint. :re: Good to see young Onosho back in the top ranks.
     
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  3. Swami

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    Ichinjo looked fast asleep. Goeido could be in real trouble, he needs to win 8 this time to keep his rank.

    Swami
     
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  4. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Champian

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    Nagoya Day 2: Tochinoshin and two yokozuna keep winning pace
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 09 July 2018
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    Newly promoted ozeki Tochinoshin rolled to another victory on Monday, the second day of the Nagoya Grand Sumo Tournament. Grand champions Hakuho and Kakuryu also remained unbeaten in the 15-day meet at Dolphins Arena.

    Tochinoshin (2-0), who aims to become the first wrestler since Hakuho in 2006 to win his ozeki debut tournament, easily dispatched Chiyonokuni (1-1). The No. 2 maegashira slapped Tochinoshin's face, but Tochinoshin remained calm and shoved Chiyonokuni out of the ring.

    Yokozuna Kakuryu (2-0) remained on course for his third straight title in a solid bout against top-ranked maegashira Kotoshogiku (0-2). A former ozeki, Kotoshogiku charged Kakuryu toward the edge, but the yokozuna turned and executed a textbook overarm throw.

    In the day's final bout, Hakuho, seeking to extend his record championship haul to 41, did not give top-ranked maegashira Shodai (1-1) room to breathe. After a false start, the grand champion held Shodai's belt and forced him out with ease.

    Mongolians Kakuryu and Hakuho are the only yokozuna competing here after Japanese yokozuna Kisenosato pulled out of this meet due to left chest muscle injury he suffered over a year ago.

    Despite suffering mixed fates on Day 1, Takayasu and Goeido, who fight as demotion-threatened ozeki, both won their bouts against komusubi wrestlers.

    Goeido (1-1) claimed his first win here by taking Tamawashi's belt with his left hand and forcing him out of the raised ring from behind. Takayasu (2-0) defeated Shohozan after the komusubi slipped when pushing the ozeki toward the edge.

    The two "kadoban" ozeki need at least eight wins here to maintain their status at the next grand tournament in September.

    Mitakeumi and Ichinojo, in sumo's third-highest rank of sekiwake, defeated maegashira wrestlers.

    Mitakeumi quickly dispatched No. 2 Ikioi (0-2) for his second straight win, while Ichinojo (1-1) survived a scare in his bout against No. 3 Abi (0-2).

    After the Mongolian Ichinojo pushed Abi toward the edge of the ring, the maegashira turned around to give him a final push. The 225-kilogram Ichinojo, however, did not move an inch and bulldozed his opponent out for his first win of the tournament.

    Swami
     
  5. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Nagoya Day 3: Grand champions, Tochinoshin stay unbeaten
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 10 July 2018
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    Grand champions Kakuryu and Hakuho, along with newly-promoted ozeki Tochinoshin, each continued their winning streak on Tuesday, the third day of the Nagoya Grand Sumo Tournament.

    Yokozuna Kakuryu (3-0) easily dispatched top-ranked east maegashira Shodai (1-2), while Hakuho (3-0) flipped the west No. 1 Kotoshogiku (0-3) on his back as both grand champions earned their third straight win at Dolphins Arena.

    Kakuryu remains on track in his bid for a third-straight top division contest, while Hakuho stands to win a 41st career championship. The Mongolians are competing without Kisenosato following the Japanese yokozuna's record-eighth straight withdrawal.

    New ozeki Tochinoshin (3-0) squared off against Shohozan (0-3) and opted to lift the recently-promoted komusubi out of the ring when the Georgian was denied his favored left-handed belt grip.

    Tochinoshin is looking for his second makuuchi title and to become the first wrestler since Hakuho in 2006 to win his ozeki debut tournament.

    Ozeki Goeido (2-1) earned a win against No. 2 maegashira Ikioi (0-3), while Chiyonokuni (2-1) got a well-deserved birthday present after taking down ozeki Takayasu (2-1) for the first time in five career meetings.

    Takayasu held strong through several onslaughts and a critical recovery from the No. 2 maegashira but eventually succumbed as the first to hit the sand when both wrestlers tumbled out of the ring.

    The two "kadoban" ozeki need at least eight wins to maintain their rank at the next grand tournament in September.

    Tamawashi (1-2), wrestling once again as a komusubi, got the better of the initial charge against sekiwake Ichinojo (1-2) and was able to push the 225-kilogram Mongolian over the straw for his first win of the tournament.

    Reinstated sekiwake Mitakeumi (3-0) also stayed undefeated with a win over Takakeisho (1-2), using his shorter opponent's momentum to turn Takakeisho around and knock him down from behind. The pair are now tied after six match-ups.

    Only three lower-ranked wrestlers remain unbeaten after three days, including No. 6 Endo, No. 9 Myogiryu, and No. 13 Asanoyama.

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    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018
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  6. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Champian

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    Things looking good so far!

    Swami
     
  7. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Hakuho withdraws from Nagoya tournament with right knee injury
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    Yokozuna Hakuho, who was seeking to extend his record championship haul to 41, pulled out of the ongoing Nagoya Grand Sumo Tournament on Wednesday due to a right knee injury.

    Hakuho won his first three bouts in the 15-day meet at Dolphins Arena, but the 33-year-old Mongolian from the Miyagino stable was diagnosed with injuries to his patellar tendon and shin bone requiring two weeks of recovery period.

    His withdrawal leaves Kakuryu as the only grand champion competing. Yokozuna Kisenosato withdrew prior to Sunday's opener.

    Hakuho has withdrawn from three of four tournaments this year. He pulled out of the New Year meet in January on Day 5 after posting a 2-2 record and did not compete in the spring tourney in March.

    Hakuho will concede Wednesday's match by default against No. 2 maegashira Chiyonokuni. The grand champion is looking to stay on track toward 1,000 top division wins.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I was surprised with this as he looked strong on Day 3.
     
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  8. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Nagoya Day 4: Kakuryu takes 1st loss after upset by Ikioi
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 11 July 2018
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    Yokozuna Kakuryu suffered his first defeat after an upset loss to Ikioi on Wednesday, the fourth day of the Nagoya Grand Sumo Tournament.

    Kakuryu (3-1) was immediately pushed onto the back foot by the No. 2 maegashira and was unable to recover against a relentless charge from Ikioi (1-3) that forced the yokozuna over the straw.

    Kakuryu, aiming for a third straight championship, is the only remaining yokozuna in competition at Dolphins Arena following his Mongolian counterpart Hakuho's withdrawal due to a right knee injury before the start of Wednesday's bouts.

    Tochinoshin (4-0) earned his fourth straight victory as a debut ozeki with a win over Abi (1-3) and is now one of only two undefeated wrestlers. The No. 3 maegashira had the Georgian briefly on the ropes before Tochinoshin attempted to lift Abi up by the belt, eventually pushing him out.

    Top-ranked maegashira Kotoshogiku (1-3) handed ozeki Goeido (2-2) a second loss and earned his first victory. Goeido narrowly recovered from being pushed from the ring, but Kotoshogiku kept on the ozeki's heels and slapped Goeido down as he slipped.

    Meanwhile, Takayasu (3-1), the other of the two "kadoban" ozeki, who need at least eight wins to maintain their status at the next grand tournament in September, was able to easily thrust out No. 1 east maegashira Shodai (1-3) for a third win.

    Sekiwake Mitakeumi (4-0) remains the only other undefeated wrestler here after quickly dispatching komusubi Tamawashi (1-3). Mitakeumi improved to 12-2 over the Mongolian, who is aiming for another promotion since losing his sekiwake status after going 9-6 at the New Year meet.

    Komusubi Shohozan (1-3) edged out sekiwake Ichinojo (1-3) for his first win despite an 84-kilogram weight disadvantage. The 225-kilogram Mongolian rebounded against Shohozan's fast initial charge but was pushed out on the komusubi's second attempt.

    The three lower-ranked wrestlers who went into Day 4 unbeaten -- No. 6 Endo, No. 9 Myogiryu, and No. 13 Asanoyama -- all suffered their first defeats.



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    The most eventful day of this basho thus far. Many good matches, upsets. Ikioi having a big win with the cushions flying.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2018
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  9. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Champian

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    Excellent updates in my absence.

    Hakuho may be nearing retirement.

    Swami
     
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  10. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Nagoya Day 5: Abi upsets grand champion Kakuryu
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 12 July 2018
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    Up-and-coming youngster Abi caused an upset Thursday at the Nagoya Grand Sumo Tournament by handing grand champion Kakuryu his second loss.

    In the final bout on Day 5, the 24-year-old No. 3 maegashira exchanged a barrage of blows with the Mongolian-born yokozuna before forcing him out backward. Abi improved to 2-3. The victory at Dolphins Arena was Abi's second over a yokozuna in consecutive meets, having beaten Hakuho at May's Summer Grand Sumo Tournament. "I got good support from the fans today. I don't like to lose, so I felt really encouraged as they urged me on," the Saitama native said.

    Ozeki Tochinoshin and sekiwake Mitakeumi both maintained perfect records one third of the way through the 15-day tournament.

    Fighting in his first meet since being promoted to sumo's second-highest rank, Georgian-born Tochinoshin used his grappling skills to overcome veteran No. 1 maegashira Kotoshogiku (1-4). After an initial false start, the powerful European battled the former ozeki for position from the jump, eventually gaining a belt hold and forcing him out.

    Contesting a ninth-straight meet among the three "sanyaku" ranks below yokozuna, Mitakeumi continued his impressive form by overcoming tenacious komusubi Shohozan. Shohozan (1-4) was characteristically quick off the mark as he tried to overcome his opponent's 26-kilogram weight advantage with a speedy attack, but Mitakeumi easily repelled his advance and shoved him out of the ring with his left arm. Mitakeumi, who climbed back to sekiwake after fighting in May as a komusubi, is chasing his first championship.

    Ozeki Takayasu improved to 4-1 by slapping down No. 2 Ikioi (1-4). The maegashira, who handed Kakuryu his first loss the day before, launched himself low and hard at Takayasu, but the ozeki reacted smartly, slipping to the slide and sending his opponent to the clay.

    Ozeki Goeido bulled his way to victory over No. 2 Chiyonokuni, quickly forcing the maegashira backward after getting a strong inside position from the jump. Chiyonokuni (3-2) was chasing a third win over a sanyaku opponent on the clay in Nagoya but lasted just seconds against the determined Goeido (3-2).

    The biggest man in the division, sekiwake Ichinojo, improved to 2-3 with a victory over No. 1 Shodai (1-4). The Mongolian-born behemoth absorbed a barrage of slaps and shoves from the maegashira before thrusting him out with a one-armed shove.

    Komusubi Tamawashi (2-3) picked up his second victory by beating No. 3 Takakeisho (2-3) with a thrust down. The Mongolian veteran used his right hand to deflect his opponent's attack and topple him at the edge of the straw.

    No. 6 maegashira and fan favorite Endo maintained his bid to climb back to the sanyaku rankings by improving to 4-1 with a victory over No. 4 Kagayaki (2-3).

     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2018
  11. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Thank you! My apologies if the updates are a little later.

    Another big upset with Abi over Kakuryu. Tochinoshin is looking strong again.
     
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  12. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Champian

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    You have been doing an excellent job!

    Swami
     
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  13. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Champian

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    Kakuryu withdraws from Nagoya meet, no yokozuna remaining
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 13 July 2018
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    Yokozuna Kakuryu withdrew from the ongoing Nagoya Grand Sumo Tournament due to a right-elbow injury on Friday, making the 15-day meet the first event in 12 years to take place without a grand champion.

    Kakuryu won his first three bouts at Dolphins Arena but suffered losses to No. 2 maegashira Ikioi and No. 3 Abi on Wednesday and Thursday, respectively. He was aiming for a third consecutive top division championship and sixth overall.

    The Mongolian yokozuna was diagnosed with arthritis in his right elbow requiring two weeks of recovery. His stablemaster Izutsu said the 32-year-old sustained the injury while training before the start of the tournament.

    "I talked with him yesterday and he said that he is having trouble exerting force on his elbow because the condition has gotten worse," Izutsu said. "I apologize that this meet has to resume without a yokozuna."

    Kakuryu had been the sole remaining yokozuna following Kisenosato's withdrawal prior to the start of the tournament, and Hakuho's withdrawal after Day 3 due to a right-knee injury.

    Kakuryu had missed all or part of four straight meets last year due to injury but had completed all three grand tournaments so far this year. He will undergo an examination to determine whether he can participate in this summer's regional tourney.

    "(Kakuryu) says he still has a goal and is in high spirits. But it's like he went from heaven at the last meet (after winning a second straight championship) to hell," Izutsu said.

    Swami
     
  14. Swami

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    Nagoya Day 6: Tochinoshin suffers 1st loss, Mitakeumi undefeated
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 13 July 2018
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    Ozeki Tochinoshin suffered his first loss at the Nagoya Grand Sumo Tournament on Friday, leaving sekiwake Mitakeumi the only wrestler at the meet with a perfect record.

    In the day's final bout at Dolphins Arena, Tochinoshin (5-1) suffered a shock defeat to komusubi Tamawashi (3-3). The newly promoted ozeki pushed his opponent toward the edge and held onto his mawashi belt with both hands, but Tamawashi wrapped his arm around the Georgian and threw him down.

    Mitakeumi (6-0) showcased his strength in a one-sided win against top-ranked maegashira Shodai (1-5). The sekiwake held onto his opponent's belt, pulled him toward the edge and gave him a final push.

    Mitakeumi, who climbed back to sekiwake after fighting in May as a komusubi, had lost three straight bouts against Shodai this year. But Friday's win improved Mitakeumi's record against the maegashira to 6-6.

    The sixth day of the 15-day tournament opened without a single grand champion in competition. Earlier in the day, Mongolian yokozuna Kakuryu pulled out due to right-elbow injury, joining Kisenosato and Hakuho on the disabled list.

    Goeido (4-2) and Takayasu (4-2) are both fighting as demotion-threatened ozeki. No. 3 Abi (2-4), who beat Kakuryu the previous day, almost pushed Goeido out of the ring, but the ozeki stayed calm and threw the maegashira down. Takayasu was defeated by No. 3 Takakeisho (3-3).

    The two "kadoban" ozeki need at least eight wins here to maintain their status at the next grand tournament in September.

    Among seven wrestlers who started the day with one loss, four maintained their position and remain one win behind the lead.

    Fan favorite Endo (5-1) beat Brazilian maegashira Kaisei (4-2) to stay one back. The two wrestlers began the day with 4-1 records, but No. 4 Kaisei slipped and fell backwards after No. 6 Endo pushed him by the neck.

    No. 5 Yoshikaze (0-6), who competed as sekiwake in two meets last year, is the only wrestler here who has not won a single bout after losing to No. 5 Daishomaru (2-4).

    Swami
     
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  15. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    It's unfortunate that all three yokozuna are out of this basho by day 6. I heard the announcer say it's the first time in nineteen years with no yokozuna competing, really? The ozeki are not doing much better which makes it more interesting. Yoshikaze better get with it. I can see he's in the autumn of his career. At least on day 6 Mitakeumi is the man on top.

    It's good to have you back with the updates Swami.
     
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  16. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Champian

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    Tochinoshin only one loss, so don't count him out just yet.

    Swami
     
  17. Swami

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    Tochinoshin withdraws from Nagoya tournament with toe injury
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 14 July 2018
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    Tochinoshin announced on Saturday his withdrawal from the ongoing Nagoya Grand Sumo Tournament due to an injury to his right big toe.

    The new ozeki was injured on Friday as he suffered his first loss of the tournament in a bout against komusubi Tamawashi. After undergoing an MRI on Saturday, Tochinoshin was diagnosed with an MP joint collateral ligament injury in his toe, requiring up to a month's rest and probable treatment.

    "(My toe) has been swollen since yesterday. It's painful, I can't even step on the ground," Tochinoshin said. "It's a little disappointing, and I'm sorry. I'll put ice on it for two or three days, and if it gets better I'll fight again."

    The 30-year-old Georgian was seeking a second makuuchi division title and to become the first wrestler since Hakuho in 2006 to win his debut tournament as an ozeki, the sport's second-highest rank.

    "It's unfortunate, but he's not in a state to wrestle," stablemaster Kasugano said. "Even though there are no yokozuna, and he wants to live up to expectations, he just can't fight well enough."

    "It's not a fracture, but clearly (the joint) is off. If we see a dramatic improvement to the pain, then he'll fight again."

    It is the first time Tochinoshin has withdrawn from a tournament since last year's New Year meet and the seventh time in his career he has missed all or part of a meet.

    Tochinoshin is the latest top-tier wrestler to pull out of the 15-day event at Dolphins Arena following the previous withdrawals of all three grand champions. Kisenosato withdrew prior to the tournament, while Hakuho and Kakuryu pulled out after Day 3 and Day 5, respectively.

    Swami
     
  18. Swami

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    Nagoya Day 7: Mitakeumi stays unbeaten to hold onto lead
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 14 July 2018
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    Sekiwake Mitakeumi stayed unbeaten Saturday to hold onto the sole lead at the Nagoya Grand Sumo Tournament.

    Fighting in his ninth-straight tournament among the three "sanyaku" rankings beneath grand champion, Mitakeumi kept a breakthrough top-level title in his sights by beating veteran Kotoshogiku on Day 7 at Dolphins Arena.

    No. 1 maegashira Kotoshogiku (2-5) came in hard from the jump, but Mitakeumi blocked his attack, gaining an inside grip and digging in at the center of the ring. He then drove Kotoshogiku back to the edge of the straw before forcing him out.

    With all three grand champions out injured, the 25-year-old Mitakeumi has a golden opportunity to lift the Emperor's Cup for the first time at the 15-day tournament in Nagoya.

    No. 3 Takakeisho (4-3) pulled off the upset of the day by defeating ozeki Goeido (4-3). Goeido tried to slap down the youngster, but Takakeisho showed excellent technique by countering the attack and thrusting the ozeki to the clay.

    "I'm just fighting my style of sumo. That's all I'm thinking about," Takakeisho said.

    The 21-year-old, who has been touted as a future champion, said he hadn't considered the possibility of a title in Nagoya despite several higher-ranked wrestlers having pulled out with injuries.

    "I'm taking it one match at a time, and I don't think about those top guns being out of the tournament," he said.

    Ozeki Tochinoshin became the latest to drop out of the tournament after suffering an injury to his right big toe. He fell to 5-2 after forfeiting his match on Day 7 against top-ranked maegashira Shodai (2-5).

    The Georgian, who was competing in his first meet since being promoted, may re-enter the competition if his condition improves, according to his stable.

    Ozeki Takayasu improved to 5-2 after quickly overpowering No. 3 Abi (2-5). The maegashira opened with a thrusting attack but was unable to budge the charging Takayasu, who drove Abi straight back and out.

    Sekiwake Ichinojo improved to 3-4 after forcing out No. 2 Ikioi (2-5). The maegashira came out aggressively but could not move Ichinojo once the 225-kilogram Mongolian set his grip on his opponent's belt.

    A trio of wrestlers from further down in the division improved to 6-1 to stay one win off the pace. Sixth-ranked Endo defeated No. 8 Kyokutaisei (1-6), fellow No. 6 Chiyotairyu beat No. 9 Myogiryu (5-2), and No. 13 Asanoyama topped No. 16 Meisei (2-5).

    Swami
     
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  19. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    With Tochinoshin out, this is anyone’s basho. Should be exciting to see if Mitakeumi can keep his momentum.
     
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  20. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Champian

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    Nagoya Day 8: Mitakeumi stays perfect midway through Nagoya meet
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 15 July 2018
    Hits: 25
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    Sekiwake Mitakeumi maintained his perfect record and the sole lead Sunday, the midway point of the 15-day meet.

    Mitakeumi (8-0) defeated No. 2 maegashira Chiyonokuni (4-4) in the tournament at Dolphins Arena with all three grand champions out of action. Chiyonokuni forced the fan-favorite sekiwake toward the edge and tried to slap him down.

    However, Mitakeumi, who has never lost to Chiyonokuni, wrapped his arms around him and forced him out.

    "I'm relieved, but I was calm during the bout," Mitakeumi said. "I'm focused on winning each bout at a time, rather than concentrating on winning the championship. I think the key is to sleep well and eat a lot."

    The next step in Mitakeumi's pursuit of a first career championship will be No. 5 Daishomaru (3-5). The two wrestlers have split their two career bouts against each other.

    Goeido and Takayasu, the two ozeki remaining following Tochinoshin's withdrawal, each won on Sunday.

    Goeido (5-3), who made his ozeki debut in September 2014, threw down No. 4 Kaisei (5-3). Takayasu (6-2) charged No. 4 Kagayaki (3-5) toward the edge and shoved him by the throat en route to winning their first career matchup.

    Three wrestlers -- No. 13 maegashira Asanoyama, and both sixth-ranked maegashira, Endo and Chiyotairyu -- started the day one win behind Mitakeumi, but only two managed to keep the pace.

    Asanoyama (7-1) worked Bulgarian No. 11 Aoiyama (3-5) towards the ridge and with a firm left-handed grip on his belt, calmly sent him out of the dohyo, overcoming his 27-kilogram weight disadvantage.

    Fan-favorite Endo (7-1) beat No. 9 Myogiryu (5-3) in a redo after their bout ended with the two wrestlers stepping out of the ring at the same time. Endo was being bulldozed out toward the edge, but resisted and instead forced Myogiryu out.

    Chiyotairyu (6-2) fell to No. 9 Yutakayama (5-3). Yutakayama chased the former komusubi around the ring and pushed him out, meeting only minimal resistance.

    Sekiwake Ichinojo suffered his fifth loss. The 225-kg Mongolian tried to hold onto No. 3 Takakeisho's mawashi, but the maegashira blocked and twisted him down. Takakeisho improved to 5-3.

    Swami
     

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