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2018 Nagoya Basho banzuke released.

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Swami, Jun 25, 2018.

  1. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

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    Kakuryu in pole position as Tochionshin moves up
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 25 June 2018
    Hits: 30
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    Kakuryu © Kyodo

    After two straight championships, yokozuna Kakuryu sits atop the rankings for the Nagoya Grand Sumo Tournament that the Japan Sumo Association published Monday.

    While the 32-year-old Mongolian goes for a grand tournament title hat-trick, much of the attention at the 15-day event at Dolphins Arena will be on the newest member of the sumo elite, Georgian ozeki Tochinoshin.

    At 30 years, 7 months when the tournament kicks off on July 8, Tochinoshin, who has battled back from knee surgery, will be the fourth-oldest wrestler to ascend to sumo's second-highest rank. He is also the first ozeki from Georgia, and the third European after Bulgarian Kotooshu and Estonian Baruto to reach that rank.

    While Tochinoshin is the No. 2 west ozeki, the two wrestlers ahead of him, Goeido and Takayasu, will be fighting to retain their ranks in Nagoya. Goeido is coming off a 3-6 record with six days off due to injury in the May tournament, while the injured Takayasu sat out the last grand tournament.

    As "kadoban" ozeki, both Goeido and Takayasu will need a minimum of eight wins to avoid demotion to sekiwake for September.

    The sekiwake rank has two familiar faces. The 225-kilogram Mongolian Ichinojo, who scraped out eight wins in May, is listed on the east, while Mitakeumi, who wrestled as a komusubi in May after five straight tournaments at sumo's third highest rank, is on the west.

    Two wrestlers return to the komusubi rank for the Nagoya tournament. Tamawashi, coming off an 8-7 record as a No. 1 maegashira, will be at the sport's fourth-highest rank for the first time since last September. And 34-year-old, 145-kg Shohozan brings his high energy and aggressive style to the komusubi rank for the first time since March 2014.

    Rank-and-file wrestler Chiyonokuni makes the biggest jump in the rankings. Having gone 12-3 in May as a No. 11 maegashira, Chiyonokuni, who will turn 28 on July 10, enters the tournament as the second-ranked west maegashira.

    Two wrestlers will make their debuts in the elite makuuchi division in July -- No. 14 maegashira Kotoeko, and No. 16 Meisei. Wrestling as a No. 2 juryo, Kotoeko was a runner-up in sumo's second tier in May with an 11-4 record.

    Onosho, May's juryo champion, will also be fighting in the top tier as a No. 11 maegashira after just one tournament in the second tier.

    Swami
     
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  2. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Good to see the new rankings. Goeido and Takayasu will surely need to fight for their ozeki rankings and surely Kisenosato will be fighting for his sumo life.

    I'm glad to hear young, fireball Onosho is back and of Shohozan's komusubi promotion.
     
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  3. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

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    Goeido may be in trouble, he has been having more and more trouble in recent tournaments just getting his majority of wins.

    Swami
     
  4. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

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    2018 July Grand Sumo Tournament Banzuke Topics
    OzekiGoeido
    • Goeido is Ozeki Kadoban for the 7th time, the last time was in September of last year.
    OzekiTakayasu
    • Takayasu is Ozeki Kadoban for the second time. He was labelled that in November of last year for the first time.
    <Goeido & Takayasu>
    • Both are the 144th and 145th Rikishi being labelled Ozeki Kadoban since the July tournament 1969. The previous one also had been Takayasu.
    • For the 18th time since July 1969 there are 2 or more Ozeki Kadoban in one tournament. This previously happened in September of last year with Goedo and Terunofuji.
    Ozeki PromotedTochinoshin
    • Tochinoshin is the 25th Rikishi to make his Ozeki Debut in Heisei Era. The previous one had been Takayasu in the July tournament of last year.
    • He is the first Rikishi from Kasugano Beya to make his Ozeki debut since Tochihikari and Tochinoumi, both promoted in July 1962.
    • He is the first Ozeki from Georgia and the 11th foreigner to reach the rank. The previous one had been Terunofuji who was promoted in July 2015.
    • Taking 60 tournaments since his Makuuchi debut means tying the first place concerning the slowest ever speed to reach the promotion to Ozeki.
    • Taking 73 tournaments since his Sumo debut, he ties the 10th place in slowness.
    • At 30 years and 7 months of age, he is the 4th oldest Rikishi to be promoted to Ozeki for the first time.
    SekiwakeIchinojo
    • Ichinoyo remains at the Sekiwake – rank for the second, in Sanyaku for the 3rd consecutive tournament.
    Sekiwake ReturnMitakeumi
    • Mitakeumi returns to the Sekiwake - rank after 2 tournaments. He stays in Sanyaku for 9 consecutive tournaments.
    Komusubi ReturnTamawashi
    • Tamawashi returns to Komusubi, the rank he previously held in September of last year, after 5 tournaments. He is back in Sanyaku after 3 tournaments.
    Komusubi ReturnShohozan
    • Shohozan returns to Komusubi after 26 tournaments. He previously held the rank in March 2014. This means the 7th slowest re-promotion to Sanyaku since Showa Era.
    Makuuchi DebutKotoeko
    • Kotoeko is the third Rikishi from Sadogatake Beya to reach Makuuchi since the current Shisho has inherited it on 25th of November 2005. He follows Kotoyuki who was promoted in January 2013.
    • Kotoeko is only the 3rd Rikishi from Miyazaki Prefecture post WWII to achieve this. The previous ones had been Toda in January 1967 (he retired under the Shikona Haguroiwa) and Kaneshiro, who was promoted in the September tournament of 1974.
    • Concerning active Rikishi in Makuuchi from Miyazaki Prefecture, the last one had been Tochihikari (in fact the already mentioned Kaneshiro who later changed his Shikona) in January 1985.
    Makuuchi DebutMeisei
    • Meisei is the third Rikishi from Tatsunami Beya to reach Makuuchi since the current Shisho has inherited it on 22nd of February 1999. He follows Ohinode who was promoted in March 1999 and Mokonami, who was promoted in the July tournament 2009.
    • He is the 24th Rikishi post WWII from Kagoshima Prefecture, following Daiamami who had been promoted in November 2017.
    Makuuchi ReturnOnosho
    • Onosho returns to Makuuchi after two tournaments.
    Juryo DebutChiyonoumi
    • Chiyonoumi i is the first Rikishi from Kokonoe Beya to make his Juryo debut since the present Shisho has inherited it on the second of August 2016. Under the previous Shisho, Chiyoshoma was promoted in the January tournament of 2016.
    • He is the 11th Rikishi post WWII from Kochi Prefecture, following Tosayutaka who had been promoted in March 2008.
    • Additionally, he is the 9th Rikishi successful in amateur Sumo as a student of Nippon Sport Science University following Daiki (current Hokutofuji) who had been promoted two years ago.
    Juryo DebutChuranoumi
    • Churanoumi is the 12th Rikishi from Kise Beya to make his Juryo debut since the present Shisho founded it on the 1st of December 2003.
    • The previous had been Daiseido the September tournament of last year. He is the 5th Rikishi post WWII from Okinawa Prefecture, following Ryuho who had been promoted in November 2002.
    • Additionally, he is the 51st former student of Nihon University to achieve this, the previous one had been Mitoryu who had been promoted in January of this year.
    <Chiyonoumi & Churanoumi>
    • Are the 127th and 128th Rikishi successful in amateur Sumo as a student to reach Juryo, the previous one had been Wakatakakage in the last tournament.
    Juryo ReturnKizenryu
    • Kizenryu returns to Juryo after 3 tournaments.
    • Being promoted to Juryo for the 9th time, he now holds the record of most promotions.
    ※Terunofuji
    • Terunofuji is the first ever former Ozeki as well as Makuuchi tournament champion to drop down to Makushita.
    Swami
     
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  5. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Wow, Terunofuji is really setting records for all the wrong reasons. :eck:

    I'm curious in the week leading up to the July tourney if all three yokozuna and all three ozeki compete a full basho. I also look forward to the debut at the top ranks of Meisei and Kotoeko.
     
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  6. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

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    Yes, I am baffled as to why Terunofuji continues to compete when there is no realistic hope of him even making it back to Makunouchi, never mind sanyaku or ozeki.

    Swami
     
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  7. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

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    Grand champion Kisenosato to miss record 8th straight meet
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 05 July 2018
    Hits: 6
    [​IMG]


    Kisenosato will withdraw from the upcoming grand sumo tournament, extending his streak of missed events to a yokozuna-record eight meets, his stablemaster said Thursday.

    Kisenosato, the first Japan-born wrestler in 19 years to gain promotion to sumo's highest rank, has missed all or part of the last seven meets due to a lingering left chest muscle injury. He has only completed one full tournament since being promoted in January 2017.

    He surpassed former yokozuna Takanohana, who missed seven full tournaments in 2001 and 2002, as the grand champion with the most consecutive meets missed since 1958, the year the six-event annual system was introduced.

    "Although I have been trying desperately to be in shape, I decided to withdraw since I haven't made enough progress," Kisenosato said. "I will put everything into competing at the next meet."

    "I'm at the point now (when the question of retirement is surfacing). But my sense of the sport, as well as my muscular strength, has improved a lot. I'll do my best to be able to come back."

    Kisenosato missed parts of four and sat out three entire meets since winning last year's Spring tournament on his yokozuna debut. The 15-day Nagoya Grand Sumo Tournament beginning Sunday will be his third straight full withdrawal.

    "He has been working hard, but would like to have a little more time. Since he is really working his body, I want him to gain confidence with more practice," Kisenosato's stablemaster Tagonoura said.

    The 32-year-old is one of three wrestlers who sit atop the latest banzuke rankings, along with Mongolians Kakuryu and Hakuho.

    Swami
     
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  8. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    I really can't say I'm even surprised at this point. I would have been shocked if he had returned and completed a full basho. I do like Kisenosato but this action will tarnish his legacy if he doesn't return in September and has eight wins. I guess if he's making progress in training, that's a plus. If he isn't ready for the September basho the JSA should be sent in to cut his hair and force him to call it a career. I do feel sympathy for Kisenosato as he put years into this profession only to be injured in the early stages of his yokozuna rank. Life is unfair like that. It would be nice to have three, healthy, active yokozuna in a tourney.
     
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  9. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

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    Yes, I think he is probably down to his very last chance now.

    Swami
     

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