2018 Kyushu Basho.

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Swami, Nov 11, 2018.

  1. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

    Message Count:
    5,834
    Trophy Points:
    3,636
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +5,226
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Kyushu Day 1: Sole grand champion Kisenosato opens Kyushu meet with loss
    Details
    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 11 November 2018
    Hits: 16
    [​IMG]


    Japanese grand champion Kisenosato opened the 15-day Kyushu Grand Sumo Tournament with a loss to Takakeisho on Sunday.

    Kisenosato, who entered a tournament as the sole yokozuna for the first time, chased the 22-year-old komusubi around the ring to get a hold of his belt. Takakeisho, however, fought back and slapped Kisenosato down with his left hand to improve his record against the grand champion to 3-2.

    "I was able to give my best in our previous bout (in September) so I tried to do the same here," said Takakeisho, who belonged to the now-defunct Takanohana stable. "I'm just going to perform what I have learned. I'm focused on doing my best every day."

    Kisenosato is aiming for his first championship since March 2017, when he made his debut at the sport's highest rank. The 32-year-old will face top-ranked maegashira Myogiryu (0-1), against whom he holds a 16-4 record.

    The three ozeki wrestlers had mixed fates on Day 1 at Fukuoka Kokusai Center.

    Takayasu posted a quick and easy win over Myogiryu before Goeido, competing in his 26th straight meet in the sport's second-highest rank, defeated top-ranked maegashira Hokutofuji in the day's penultimate bout.

    Tochinoshin, who is fighting in his third meet since being promoted, lost to No. 2 maegashira Tamawashi in a bout lasting only three seconds. The Georgian reached for Tamawashi's belt, but was unable to resist Tamawashi's slaps and stepped out of the ring.

    "I'm glad. The support from the audience allowed me to beat him. I'm going to stick to the basics here so I think I'll do better than the previous meets," said Tamawashi, who had a 4-11 record in September.

    Sekiwake Mitakeumi, who won his maiden championship in July, suffered a loss to No. 2 Tochiozan, who twisted the fan-favorite down for the win. Ichinojo was on the backfoot against No. 3 maegashira Nishikigi but the 227-kilogram sekiwake resisted and edged him out.

    Swami
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  2. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

    Message Count:
    6,379
    Trophy Points:
    3,142
    Location:
    USA
    Ratings:
    +9,313
    Member Since:
    January 25, 2011
    Not a good start for Kisenosato or for that matter Tochinoshin. The yusho race could be very interesting.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

    Message Count:
    5,834
    Trophy Points:
    3,636
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +5,226
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Kyushu Day 2: Kisenosato suffers second straight upset
    Details
    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 12 November 2018
    Hits: 31
    [​IMG]


    Yokozuna Kisenosato suffered his second straight loss at the 15-day Kyushu Grand Sumo Tournament after being defeated by top-ranked maegashira Myogiryu on Monday.

    Kisenosato, the only yokozuna competing at Fukuoka Kokusai Center following withdrawals by Mongolians Hakuho and Kakuryu, was unable to find an opening against the former sekiwake.

    Myogiryu kept his opponent upright throughout the bout and eventually forced the higher-ranked wrestler backwards out of the ring before Kisenosato crashed to the ground.

    Despite having only beaten Kisenosato four times in 20 previous bouts, Myogiryu picked up his first kinboshi prize in five years and third overall for defeating the yokozuna.

    The 32-year-old Kisenosato, who went 10-5 in his comeback run at the Autumn meet in September, will fight No. 1 maegashira Hokutofuji on Day 3.

    The pair have split their two previous bouts.

    In earlier matches, Takakeisho pulled off his second straight upset and remains perfect at 2-0 after defeating ozeki Goeido (1-1).

    The 22-year-old komusubi, who defeated Kisenosato on Day 1, put Goeido on the defensive from the outset. Takakeisho got his taller opponent off balance and slapped him down to the clay.

    Among the other ozeki, Tochinoshin (1-1) chased out No. 3 Nishikigi (0-2) to record his first win, while Takayasu (2-0) endured an all-out offensive from Hokutofuji (0-2) to remain unbeaten.

    Mitakeumi (1-1) redeemed an opening loss by forcing out No. 2 Tamawashi (1-1), while his sekiwake counterpart Ichinojo (1-1) was slapped down by No. 2 Tochiozan (1-1).

    Brazilian-born wrestler Kaisei, fighting as a komusubi for the first time since 2016, is set to enter the tournament on Day 3 after sitting out the opening matches with a minor leg injury.

    Swami
     
  4. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

    Message Count:
    5,834
    Trophy Points:
    3,636
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +5,226
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    I hate to say it, but it looks like the end for Kisenosato, he cannot withdraw again after being away so long. Only one option left for him now.

    Swami
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

    Message Count:
    6,379
    Trophy Points:
    3,142
    Location:
    USA
    Ratings:
    +9,313
    Member Since:
    January 25, 2011

    Agreed! Kisenosato has dug a hole for himself in just two days of this tourney. Again, he is fighting for his sumo life. He's got Hokutofuji on Tuesday.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

    Message Count:
    5,834
    Trophy Points:
    3,636
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +5,226
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Everyone is continuing to target the side that Kisenosato injured last year, and it makes him very hesitant. If he doesn't win today, he will have to retire.

    Swami
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

    Message Count:
    5,834
    Trophy Points:
    3,636
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +5,226
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Kyushu Day 3: Kisenosato suffers third straight loss
    Details
    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 13 November 2018
    Hits: 33
    [​IMG]


    The loss against Hokutofuji ratcheted up the pressure on the home-grown yokozuna, who remains winless since starting the 15-day tournament at Fukuoka Kokusai Center as the sole grand champion.

    The yokozuna gave his opponent a strong shove at the opening impact, but seemed to lack power from the problematic left side of his upper body as the bout progressed. With both wrestlers thrusting and shoving one another in the center of the ring, Hokutofuji knocked Kisenosato back with a palm to the throat before thrusting him down to the clay. The victory earned Hokutofuji a fifth career "kinboshi" prize for beating a grand champion.

    The poor start is likely to fuel speculation about another withdrawal for the injury plagued Kisenosato, who made a successful comeback with a 10-5 record at the Autumn Grand Tournament in September.

    Ozeki Takayasu stayed perfect with a slap-down win over komusubi Kaisei (0-1-2), who sat out the first two days with a leg injury. Takayasu evaded an attempted belt grip by the big Brazilian before sending him to the ground with a slap to the back.

    No. 2 maegashira Tochiozan stayed undefeated by upsetting ozeki Goeido (1-2) with a well-executed beltless arm throw. Tochiozan blocked an attempted shoulder blast at the opening, slipping to the side and using Goeido's momentum to sling him from the ring.

    Georgian ozeki Tochinoshin improved to 2-1 with a slap down against No. 1 Myogiryu. The maegashira, who earned a kimboshi for beating Kisenosato on Day 2, wrapped his arms around Tochinoshin's body but was forced to backpedal. The powerful ozeki took control after setting his feet, upending the smaller wrestler in 14.3 seconds.

    Giant sekiwake Ichinojo (1-2) lost to fellow Mongolian Tamawashi, dropping to 5-6 head-to-head in their career. No. 2 Tamawashi won by force-out after lodging a hand on his 1.93-meter, 227-kg opponent's neck and driving him back over the straw bales. Ichinojo became the second high-ranked victim of the tournament for Tamawashi (2-1), who defeated Tochinoshin on the opening day.

    Komusubi Takakeisho marched to a third-straight win, following impressive victories over Kisenosato and Goeido on Days 1 and 2, respectively. Fighting No. 3 Ryuden (1-2) for the first time in the top division, Takakeisho quickly secured a thrust-out for his easiest win here so far.

    Sekiwake Mitakeumi improved to 2-1 with a force-out win against No. 3 Nishikigi. After a hard initial impact, rank-and-file wrestler Nishikigi (0-3) tried to secure a double outside grip but was quickly driven out by the powerful Mitakeumi, whose status as a fan favorite continues to grow since a maiden tournament victory in Nagoya in July.

    Swami
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  8. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

    Message Count:
    6,379
    Trophy Points:
    3,142
    Location:
    USA
    Ratings:
    +9,313
    Member Since:
    January 25, 2011
    This is becoming embarrassing. I feel so bad for Kisenosato. One paper, with Hakuho and Kakuryu out, he should be in the driver's seat. He has Tochiozan on Wednesday, that's if he doesn't pull out. Again, I do feel sorry for the guy. He looks so frustrated.

    Nevertheless a good win for Hokutofuji.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

    Message Count:
    5,834
    Trophy Points:
    3,636
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +5,226
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    If he withdraws this time, he might - I emphasise might - get one last chance in January but he is facing the last chance now.

    Swami
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

    Message Count:
    5,834
    Trophy Points:
    3,636
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +5,226
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Kyushu Day 4: Kisenosato falls to 4th straight loss
    Details
    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 14 November 2018
    Hits: 34
    [​IMG]


    Grand champion Kisenosato fell to his fourth straight loss on Wednesday, becoming the first yokozuna to suffer four consecutive losses from the start of a grand sumo tournament in 87 years.

    Kisenosato, the sole yokozuna competing, logged the unwished-for record in a loss to rank-and-filer Tochiozan at Fukuoka Kokusai Center. The No. 2 maegashira remains one of three undefeated wrestlers in the Kyushu Grand Sumo Tournament after earning his fifth career "kimboshi" prize for defeating a grand champion.

    The Japanese yokozuna put Tochiozan on the defensive from the outset, getting an underarm grip and seesawing him toward the edge of the ring. But as Kisenosato attempted a final shove, Tochiozan executed a last-ditch underarm throw and sent the yokozuna down on his stomach before stepping out of the ring at nearly the same time. After conferring, however, the referees decided in favor of Tochiozan.

    On Day 3, Kisenosato became the first yokozuna in 26 years to start a tournament with an 0-3 record following early losses to komusubi Takakeisho, and top-ranked maegashira Myogiryu and Hokutofuji. Asahifuji was the last yokozuna to post three straight losses at a grand tournament. Following his loss on Day 3 of the 1992 New Year meet, the four-time makuuchi division champion and current Isegahama stablemaster announced his retirement.

    All three ozeki recorded Day 4 victories. In the day's penultimate bout, Goeido (2-2) ended a two-day losing streak with a win against No. 2 Tamawashi (2-2). Tamawashi, who has racked up wins against an ozeki and sekiwake so far, lost his balance after the initial charge and provided little challenge for the veteran ozeki.

    In their first top division bout, Takayasu earned a quick victory against winless No. 3 Nishikigi. The undefeated ozeki drove Nishikigi back on the initial charge and reeled in the maegashira for a textbook slap-down.

    Tochinoshin (3-1) overpowered komusubi Kaisei (0-2-2) to earn his third straight win. The Georgian ozeki immediately got his favored right-handed belt grip and showcased his Herculean strength by lifting the second heaviest man in the division over the straw.

    Takakeisho also improved to 4-0 with a convincing win against No. 4 Shodai. The 22-year-old komusubi dug in low and drove his opponent out with a series of inflexible shoves. The first Chiganoura stable wrestler to attain "sanyaku" status as a member of one of the three ranks below yokozuna, Takakeisho has posted winning records at the last three tournaments in his quest for a maiden top-division title.

    Both sekiwake wrestlers took losses on Day 4. Mitakeumi (2-2), still fighting for an ozeki promotion, was defeated by Myogiryu (2-2). Mitakeumi took the the No. 1 maegashira to the edge of the straw but Myogiryu recovered, getting ahold of the sekiwake's belt and driving him out for the win.

    Ichinojo (1-3) was overpowered by No. 1 Hokutofuji (2-2) despite his 65-kilogram weight advantage. The Mongolian sekiwake repelled several charges from his lighter opponent, but was eventually forced out as Hokutofuji delivered a fatal push.

    No. 10 Sadanoumi, who entered Day 3 as the only other undefeated rank-and-file wrestler besides Tochiozan, suffered his first loss at the hands of former ozeki and hometown favorite Kotoshogiku (3-1).

    Swami
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  11. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

    Message Count:
    6,379
    Trophy Points:
    3,142
    Location:
    USA
    Ratings:
    +9,313
    Member Since:
    January 25, 2011
    Kisenosato came so close and looked good but to no avail. A yokozuna 0-4 the first in 87 years. Not good indeed. He has Tamawashi (2-2) on Thursday. If he can't beat a 2-2 Maegashira ranked rikishi, it's over.

    Tochinoshin looked good today, back to normal. Takayasu looks great so far. Takakeisho looks to be having a great start as well.

    I'm predicting Ichinojo loses his sekiwake rank in this tourney. Hokutofuji is a bull.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  12. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

    Message Count:
    5,834
    Trophy Points:
    3,636
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +5,226
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    If memory serves me right Tamawashi beat Kisenosato back in September. I think Kisenosato will withdraw, and perhaps try one last time in January. It is getting to the stage where he is tarnishing the rank of Yokozuna by not making his comeback stick.

    Swami
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  13. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

    Message Count:
    5,834
    Trophy Points:
    3,636
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +5,226
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Yokozuna Kisenosato pulls out of Kyushu Basho
    Details
    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 15 November 2018
    Hits: 25
    [​IMG]


    Grand champion Kisenosato withdrew from the ongoing Kyushu Grand Sumo Tournament Thursday citing a knee injury, the latest in a string of setbacks that will again raise the prospect of his retirement.

    The news comes a day after Kisenosato, the first Japan-born wrestler in 19 years to gain promotion to sumo’s highest rank, suffered his fourth consecutive defeat at the 15-day meet at Fukuoka Kokusai Center where he was the sole yokozuna competing.

    “I entered the meet in good condition but sustained a new injury (to my right knee) on opening day,” said Kisenosato, who has struggled to shake nagging injuries to his knee, ankle, and chest and arm muscles.

    “I went ahead and competed from the second day onwards but I was in far from my best form, thus the withdrawal. I’m very sorry. I’m disappointed that I couldn’t live up to the expectations,” he said.

    After missing eight straight meets, the most ever by a yokozuna, Kisenosato finished with a 10-5 record at the September tournament to quiet fans who had been calling for him to bring his career to an end.

    In Fukuoka, Kisenosato became the first yokozuna in 87 years to lose four bouts in a row to open a basho. Miyagiyama, who got off to a dismal 0-4 start in January 1931, was the most recent before him.

    Speaking to reporters after his announcement to pull out, Kisenosato repeatedly apologized for not being able to last the full 15 days, while also speaking positively about his next opportunity to compete on the raised ring.

    “I do want to put on a good performance again. I’ll have to undergo medical tests (on my knee). First, I have to heal the injury, then I’ll think. My job is to do what it takes to get back on the dohyo,” he said.

    The Tagonoura stable wrestler has only completed one full tournament since becoming the 72nd grand champion in sumo history in January 2017.

    It is the 10th time in his career he is not going the full distance in a grand tournament. Kisenosato’s fifth-day opponent Tamawashi wins by forfeit.

    Two other yokozuna, Mongolians Hakuho and Kakuryu, announced their withdrawals before the Kyushu tourney got underway. Hakuho has yet to recover from last month’s right knee surgery, and Kakuryu is nursing a right ankle injury.


    Swami
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  14. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

    Message Count:
    5,834
    Trophy Points:
    3,636
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +5,226
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Kyushu Day 5: Tochiozan sets pace after Kisenosato's withdrawal
    Details
    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 15 November 2018
    Hits: 21
    [​IMG]


    Rank-and-file wrestler Tochiozan beat ozeki Takayasu and earned his fifth-straight win Thursday. With no remaining yokozuna in competition, Tochiozan shares the lead with komusubi Takakeisho. Both wrestlers are seeking their first top-division title.

    In the day's final bout, Tochiozan and Takayasu, who both entered the match undefeated, struggled to gain the upper hand. The ozeki got the first opportunity by driving Tochiozan to the edge, but the maegashira circled out of harm's way.

    Tochiozan retaliated but Takayasu resisted and forced a standoff in the center of the raised ring. With the pressure mounting, Tochiozan mustered his strength and countered with a mighty underarm throw, heaving Takayasu out to his first loss.

    The 31-year-old Tochiozan, a former sekiwake, has already beaten both sekiwake, two of the three ozeki and handed Kisenosato his fourth straight loss on Wednesday. Tochiozan improved to 20-7 against Takayasu.

    Takakeisho also remains undefeated after beating sekiwake Ichinojo (1-4). The Mongolian attempted to use his 227-kilogram frame to deflect the komusubi's shoves, but was eventually pushed off balance and out of the ring.

    In their first top division bout, Nishikigi (1-4) beat ozeki Goeido (2-3) to record his first win of the tournament. Goeido was looking for an easy push-out win and attempted to drive the No. 3 maegashira back towards the straw. But Nishikigi quickly manufactured an underarm lock, spinning at the edge and throwing the ozeki onto his back.

    Top-ranked maegashira Hokutofuji (3-2) produced another Day 5 upset by beating ozeki Tochinoshin for the first time in their three top-level meetings. Hokutofuji, who earned his fifth "kimboshi" prize for beating Kisenosato on Day 3, denied Tochinoshin his favored belt hold and kept the Georgian upright. When Tochinoshin switched gears and attempted to pull down his opponent, Hokutofuji landed a well-timed lunge and drove Tochinoshin over the straw.

    In the day's first upper rank match-up, Kaisei (1-2-2) defeated sekiwake Mitakeumi (2-3). The Brazilian komusubi entered the meet on Day 3 due to a minor leg injury. Kaisei thwarted Mitakeumi's initial charge and rebounded at the edge of the straw, driving his lighter opponent out at the opposite side to pick up his first win.

    Five rank-and-filers stand one win off the pace after Day 5, including No. 5 Chiyotairyu, No. 7 Abi, No. 9 Daieisho, No. 13 Onosho and No. 15 Daiamami. Former ozeki and hometown favorite Kotoshogiku, currently ranked No. 9, fell to 3-2 after losing to Abi. No. 7 Shohozan (2-3), a fellow Fukuoka native, was beaten by Daieisho.

    Swami
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  15. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

    Message Count:
    6,379
    Trophy Points:
    3,142
    Location:
    USA
    Ratings:
    +9,313
    Member Since:
    January 25, 2011
    Big upsets today! All three ozeki losing. This yusho is wide open.

    Not at all surprised with Kisenosato pulling out. So sad. I just wonder if we've seen the last of him. I can only imagine how the Japanese sumo fans feel.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  16. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

    Message Count:
    5,834
    Trophy Points:
    3,636
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +5,226
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    It's anybody guess who will win the yusho this time, wide-open as you say.

    I think Kisenosato will try one last time in January, and if he can't do well he will have to retire.

    Swami
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  17. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

    Message Count:
    5,834
    Trophy Points:
    3,636
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +5,226
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Kyushu Day 6: Takakeisho improves to 6-0, remains lone unbeaten wrestler
    Details
    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 16 November 2018
    Hits: 12
    [​IMG]


    Takakeisho became the only wrestler with a perfect record following his win over fellow komusubi Kaisei on Friday, the sixth day of the 15-day Kyushu Grand Sumo Tournament.

    Takakeisho grabbed Kaisei's throat before thrusting the Brazilian down to the clay with his left hand at Fukuoka Kokusai Center. Kaisei (1-3-2) had missed the first two days of the tournament due to a left calf injury, and was on the backfoot from the outset.

    The 22-year-old Takakeisho, who opened this meet with a win over grand champion Kisenosato, will face sekiwake Mitakeumi (3-3) on Saturday.

    Ozeki Takayasu (5-1) bounced back from his Day 5 defeat, beating No. 2 maegashira Tamawashi (3-3). Takayasu is now part of a six-way tie, one win behind Takakeisho.

    With all three grand champions out injured, the 28-year-old Takayasu still has an opportunity to claim his maiden top-division championship. Takayasu will face No. 3 maegashira Ryuden (1-5) on Saturday for the first time in the top-makuuchi division.

    No. 2 Tochiozan suffered his first loss of the tournament, losing to No. 3 Nishikigi (2-4) after defeating five of the six highest-ranked wrestlers in the tournament. The only elite wrestler to avoid Tochiozan is his Kasugano Stable cohort, ozeki Tochinoshin, whom he won't face -- since stablemates don't face each other except in championship playoffs.

    In the day's final bout, Tochinoshin (3-3) was pushed out by No. 4 Shodai (4-2). The Georgian has now lost seven of 12 career bouts against the maegashira.

    "My body moved really well. I'm just wrestling the way I always do," Shodai said. "I think I've been wrestling in a good condition here, and hope to continue this until the final day."

    In the penultimate bout, Goeido posted his third win by crushing No. 3 Ryuden's hopes of beating an ozeki on his first try. The ozeki resisted Ryuden's attempt at a throw, and forced him backwards as the maegashira collapsed on his back.

    The 227-kilogram Ichinojo (1-5) fell to his fifth straight loss, while fellow sekiwake Mitakeumi managed to post a win over Hokutofuji (3-3). The Mongolian mountain Ichinojo resisted top-ranked maegashira Myogiryu's slaps at the edge, but stepped out of the ring while he was reaching for his opponent's belt. Myogiryu improved to 4-2.

    Swami
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  18. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

    Message Count:
    6,379
    Trophy Points:
    3,142
    Location:
    USA
    Ratings:
    +9,313
    Member Since:
    January 25, 2011
    I would like to see Kisenosato make one last effort but only if he's 100%. If not, he just doesn't have what it takes to be a grand champion anymore.

    A good match on Friday between Shohozan and Kotoshogiku. My favourite match this basho thus far. I also liked the winning hold, the arm lock, Nishikigi had on Tochiozan for the win.

    I'll be eager to see how far Takakeisho can go.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  19. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

    Message Count:
    5,834
    Trophy Points:
    3,636
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +5,226
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Ichinojo looks absolutely pathetic, a slow lumbering target.

    Swami
     
  20. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

    Message Count:
    5,834
    Trophy Points:
    3,636
    Location:
    Ballymoney, Co Antrim
    Ratings:
    +5,226
    Member Since:
    April 2006
    Kyushu Day 7: Takakeisho suffers 1st loss but keeps lead
    Details
    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 17 November 2018
    Hits: 6
    [​IMG]


    The 22-year-old komusubi dropped to 6-1 when he succumbed to a ferocious slapdown against sekiwake Mitakeumi on Day 7 of the 15-day tournament at Fukuoka Kokusai Center.

    Mitakuemi (4-3) had the momentum from the opening collision and looked set for a quick pushout before Takakeisho slipped to the side and circled behind the sekiwake. The pair then exchanged a furious series of slaps and pushes at the center of the ring before Mitakeumi slammed Takekeisho to the clay.

    Mitakeumi, winner of the Nagoya tournament in July, is aiming to overcome his lackluster start in Fukuoka as he pursues promotion to ozeki. Mitakeumi improved to 5-3 head-to-head against Takakeisho, including victories in their past three meetings.

    Rank-and-file wrestlers No. 9 Daieisho and No. 13 Onosho share the lead at 6-1 following wins over No. 7 Abi (5-2) and No. 16 Arawashi (1-6), respectively.

    Starting the day one win off the pace, ozeki Takayasu (5-2) was forced out by rank-and-file grappler Ryuden following a 1-minute, 58-second marathon. In their first top-level meeting, No. 4 Ryuden (2-5) secured a strong right-hand grip at the opening collision, but the heavier Takayasu held his ground. As the pair battled for position, Ryuden gripped both hands on Takayasu’s belt, then broke a long stalemate at the center of the ring by driving the ozeki out.

    Ozeki Tochinoshin suffered an upset against No. 4 Yoshikaze, dropping to 3-4. The powerful Georgian searched for a belt grip at the opening, but Yoshikaze stayed low to evade the hold. Unable to get a handhold, Tochinoshin tried to initiate a throw but was moved off balance by Yoshikaze (4-3) who reversed the throw and tossed his higher-ranked opponent to the clay.

    A Kyushu native, the 36-year-old veteran Yoshikaze received one of the biggest ovations of the day for his victory. “I’m really thankful … the fans really supported me and it gives me power. I will do my style of sumo and try to impress them in my remaining matches,” Yoshikaze said. “I don’t really care who my opponent is, whether maegashira or ozeki. … I have to be mentally strong no matter who, and today it just happened to be against an ozeki,” he said.

    Komusubi Kaisei (2-3-2) picked up his second win by forcing out No. 1 Myogiryu (4-3). Both wrestlers looked for a belt grip at the outset, but it was the big Brazilian who secured a hold and pushed his way to victory.

    Sekiwake Ichinojo (2-5) picked up his first win since the opening day by pushing out No. 5 Chiyotairyu (5-2).

    After starting the tournament with five straight wins, No.2 Tochiozan (5-2) suffered his second loss in as many days, succumbing to a pushout against No. 1 Hokutofuji (4-3).


    Swami
     

Share This Page