2018 Aki Basho.

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Swami, Sep 9, 2018.

  1. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

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    Aki Day 1: Kisenosato makes winning return at Autumn tournament
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 09 September 2018
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    Grand champion Kisenosato made a winning return on Sunday at the Autumn Grand Sumo Tournament after missing a record-setting eight consecutive meets due to injury.

    Mongolian grand champions Hakuho and Kakuryu followed Kisenosato by winning their respective bouts on the first day of the 15-day tournament at Tokyo's Ryogoku Kokugikan. All three yokozuna competed together for the first time since January.

    Kisenosato has his career on the line after missing all or part of the last eight tournaments due to a left chest muscle injury, but he managed to open the tournament with a convincing win over top-ranked maegashira Ikioi.

    In front of a cheering crowd, Kisenosato, the first Japan-born wrestler in 19 years to gain promotion to sumo's highest rank, wrapped his arms around Ikioi and charged him out of the ring.

    Hakuho beat Tamawashi, slapping the komusubi's face for a belt-hold and a quick push out, while Kakuryu drove out komusubi Takakeisho in the day's final bout.

    Ozeki Tochinoshin posted an easy win over No. 2 Chiyotairyu by charging him toward the edge and lifting him over the straw. The Georgian, who is fighting in his second meet since being promoted, is fighting as a demotion-threatened "kadoban" ozeki and needs at least eight wins to maintain his status at the next grand tournament.

    The remaining ozeki had mixed fates. Takayasu bulldozed No. 2 maegashira Yutakayama out, but Goeido lost his bout to Brazilian maegashira Kaisei.

    Sekiwake Mitakeumi, who won his first career championship in July, started his campaign for a second-straight championship and promotion to ozeki by beating No. 3 Shodai.

    Mitakeumi was pushed toward the edge by the 162-kilogram Shodai, but he bounced back and shoved him out before any harm was done.

    In a bout between No. 14 maegashira wrestlers, makuuchi-division debutant Takanosho overcame a 36-kg weight disadvantage to earn his first win over Chiyomaru.

    Swami
     
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  2. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    It's great to see Kisenosato back and a good win to start against Ikioi. All three yokozuna looked great on day 1. The only upset was Goeido's loss to Kaisei. I'm glad to see Yoshikaze win on the first day. I'm hoping for an great tourney.
     
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  3. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

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    Yes, I hope Kisenosato can stay in contention right to the end.

    Swami
     
  4. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

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    Aki Day 2: Kisenosato keeps comeback on track with impressive win
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 10 September 2018
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    Grand champion Kisenosato continued his comeback from injury in winning fashion Monday with a hard-fought victory over komusubi Takakeisho at the Autumn Grand Sumo Tournament.

    Returning after missing a record eight-straight meets, Kisenosato withstood an opening onslaught from the quick and powerful up-and-comer to secure an impressive win on Day 2 of the 15-day tourney.

    Takakeisho (0-2) looked victory bound after turning Kisenosato around and slinging him by his belt to the edge of the straw, but the Japanese-born grand champion held his ground, gripping the komusubi by his torso before thrusting him to the deck.

    All three yokozuna stayed undefeated at Tokyo's Ryogoku Kokugikan after Mongolian-born grand champions Kakuryu and Hakuho won their respective bouts.

    Kakuryu made quick work of No. 1 maegashira Kaisei (1-1), using a left hand grip to turn around his opponent and push him out from the rear.

    He improved to 14-0 against the Brazilian-born wrestler, who is still chasing his first "kinboshi" award for beating a grand champion.

    No. 1 Ikioi (0-2) made Hakuho work hard for his victory in the final bout of the day. The all-time championship record-holder found himself pushed to the edge of the ring before toppling Ikioi with an overarm throw.

    Ozeki Goeido advanced to 1-1 after withstanding a vigorous thrusting attack from Mongolian komusubi Tamawashi (0-2).

    Tamawashi gained forward momentum following the jump after plowing straight through Goeido's opening face slap. The ozeki shoved his opponent back, however, securing an inside left-hand grip before forcing him out.

    Ozeki Tochinoshin stayed undefeated following a straightforward win over No. 2 Yutakayama (0-2). The powerfully built Georgian, who retired from the previous tourney with a foot injury, held his ground against a charging Yutakayama before lifting him out by the belt.

    Ozeki Takayasu also stayed perfect with a push-out victory over sekiwake Ichinojo (1-1), snapping a three-match losing streak against the giant Mongolian.

    Facing a 47-kilogram disadvantage, Takayasu used footspeed to evade the heaviest man in the division before hitting low and hard to drive him from the ring.

    Sekiwake Mitakeumi, who won his first career title at July's Nagoya grand tourney, moved to 2-0 with a push-out victory over Chiyotairyu, ranked No. 2 among the rank-and-file maegashira wrestlers.

    Having won their previous meeting in May, Chiyotairyu (0-2) almost pushed and slapped his to another victory, but Mitakeumi stood firm at the edge of the ring before shoving his opponent out backward.

    Swami
     
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  5. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Kisenosato victory was indeed hard-fought as he came back to win from a good match with Takakeisho. Kisenosato has great ring presence in this match. I'm just hoping he gets at least eight to ten wins and stays uninjured. It will be interesting to see him wrestle someone like Tochinochi or the other two yokozuna.

    If Mitakeumi has double digit wins in this basho is he eligible for an ozeki promotion in November?
     
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  6. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

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    Yes, Kisenosato defended well today and showed great ring sense.

    I think if Mitakeumi was to get 12 or 13 wins, he would probably get promotion for November.

    Swami
     
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  7. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

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    Aki Day 3: All 3 grand champions stay undefeated at Autumn meet
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 11 September 2018
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    Grand champion Kisenosato secured a third consecutive victory in his first meet back from injury on Tuesday, as most of the elite wrestlers in the top division maintained spotless records at the Autumn Grand Sumo Tournament.

    In the day's final bout at Tokyo's Ryogoku Kokugikan, Kisenosato braved a flurry of slaps from maegashira No. 2 Yutakayama (0-3) and drove his opponent to the straw on the third day of the 15-day tournament. But Yutakayama did not relent, as the pair, fighting for the first time, locked arms and battled to gain the upper hand.

    After a brief pause, Yutakayama looked set to earn his first win against a grand champion when he drove the yokozuna to edge of the ring, but Kisenosato dug in and twisted Yutakayama down while falling to the clay himself.

    The referees were called out to debate the outcome and eventually awarded the match to the dogged grand champion.

    Mongolian grand champions Kakuryu and Hakuho also picked up wins, defeating top-ranked maegashira Ikioi (0-3) and Kaisei (1-2), respectively. All three yokozuna are competing together for the first time since January.

    Kakuryu, who withdrew from the July meet where he had been seeking a three-peat, survived a solid effort from Ikioi, who has won five "kinboshi" awards for defeating a grand champion. Kakuryu slipped to the side as the winless maegashira attempted a final shove and thrusted Ikioi down to the clay.

    Hakuho, still looking for a record-extending 41st makuuchi division title, fought for a solid belt-hold on the Brazilian-born Kaisei and eventually turned him around and down with a strong under-arm throw.

    After a simultaneous fall was deemed too close to call, a rematch between defending champion Mitakeumi (3-0) and komusubi Tamawashi (0-3) went in favor of the sekiwake. Mitakeumi, gunning for an ozeki promotion and a second straight top division title, took the force of Tamawashi's initial charge and tried to push back, but changed tack for a quick slap-down win.

    Takakeisho (1-2) caused the upset of the night, beating ozeki Tochinoshin (2-1) for his first win of the tournament. The spry komusubi blasted inside the powerful Georgian's reach, found his left arm and pulled Tochinoshin down to his first loss.

    Ozeki Goeido (2-1) charged in fast against sekiwake Ichinojo (1-2), turning the 227-kilogram Mongolian to his side by the belt and deftly pushing the big man out for the win. The two wrestlers are now tied after 16 career matchups.

    Ozeki Takayasu (3-0) held on for a win against Chiyotairyu (0-3). The No. 2 maegashira drove Takayasu to the straw and tried to thrust the ozeki out, but Takayasu brought down a powerful left-handed shove as he twisted out of harm's way and slapped his opponent out.

    Among the rank-and-file wrestlers, No. 5 Asanoyama, No. 8 Kotoshogiku, No. 9 Hokutofuji, No. 12 Nishikigi, and No. 15 Yoshikaze all maintained perfect records.

    Fan-favorite Endo remained winless after narrowly losing to No. 3 Shodai (1-2), while No. 11 Kyokutaisei (1-2) earned his first win but left the ring limping after injuring his right knee in a bout against No. 10 Daieisho (1-2).

    No. 14 Takanosho (1-2), who made a winning makuuchi division debut on Sunday, was thrusted down by No. 15 Chiyoshoma (2-1) for his second straight defeat.

    Swami
     
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  8. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    A big Mono-ii day for day 3. Kisenosato is still perfect but not dominating like the two other yokozuna. I hope if he has any ring rust it's wearing off. I just hope he doesn't get hurt and gets a respectable record for this basho.

    Takakeisho seems to know how to beat Tochinoshin with their record. I was surprised by that match.

    I thought that Endo and Shodai should have had a rematch and I also thought Mikakeumi won the first time before his rematch.

    Glad to see Yoshikaze at 3-0. Hokutofuji and Kotoshogiku look good thus far as well.
     
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  9. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

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    Given his lengthy absence it is inevitable there will be a bit of rustiness with Kisenosato but all things considered he looks OK so far.

    Swami
     
  10. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

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    Kyokutaisei withdraws from competition
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    Written by Tachiai.org
    Category: News
    Published: 12 September 2018
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    Maegashira 11 Kyokutaisei has withdrawn from the 2018 Aki Basho after suffering an injury to the meniscus in his left knee during his Day 3 match against Daieisho.

    The Hokkaido native hurt himself while pivoting on the edge of the dohyo in his first win this September, and was in considerable pain while dismounting the dohyo.

    Kyokutaisei will require a month of rest and treatment, however, his Oyakata is hopeful that his pain is only temporary and that he will return to action before Aki is over.

    This marks the first time Kyokutaisei has gone kyujo since joining sumo in 2008.

    His Day 4 opponent, Ryuden, will receive a fusen win.

    Swami
     
  11. Swami

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    Aki Day 4: Undefeated Kisenosato tested again
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 12 September 2018
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    Grand champion Kisenosato emptied the tanks yet again and pulled off his fourth consecutive win Wednesday at the Autumn Grand Sumo Tournament.

    Kisenosato had to muster all of his strength to take on top-ranked maegashira Kaisei (1-3), the second heaviest wrestler in the top division who boasts a 31-kilogram weight advantage over the grand champion.

    The two wrestlers locked belts and held strong over the 59-second match until Kisenosato finally stepped on the gas and edged his opponent out. The Japanese yokozuna earned the win and a bloody nose for his effort, and improved to 12-0 against the Brazilian, who is still looking for his first win against a grand champion.

    All three grand champions and all three ozeki earned wins on the fourth day of the 15-day tournament at Tokyo's Ryogoku Kokugikan.

    In the day's final bout, Kakuryu turned around No. 2 maegashira Yutakayama (0-4) and pushed him over the straw. Hakuho defeated winless Chiyotairyu (0-4), hurling him to the ground with masterful overarm throw after keeping the No. 2 maegashira on the ropes.

    Goeido (3-1) and Takayasu (4-0) recorded quick victories against No. 1 maegashira Ikioi (0-4) and komusubi Takakeisho (1-3), as each ozeki easily pulled their respective opponents down after blocking the initial charge.

    Komusubi Tamawashi (0-4) had to fight a second straight rematch, this time against ozeki Tochinoshin (3-1).

    In their first bout, Tochinoshin went for a fast pull-down but Tamawashi bounced back and pushed the Georgian to the edge of the ring. As Tamawashi made a diving charge, Tochinoshin pulled his opponent down and the wrestlers' simultaneous fall was deemed too close to call.

    The second time around, Tamawashi quickly drove a bloody-faced Tochinoshin to the edge again, but Tochinoshin maneuvered to the side and used the momentum for a thrust-down victory. Tamawashi also lost a rematch against Mitakeumi on Day 3.

    Tochinoshin is fighting as a demotion-threatened "kadoban" ozeki and needs at least eight wins to maintain his status at the next grand tournament.

    Defending champion Mitakeumi (4-0), seeking a second straight top division title and possible ozeki promotion, got the better of Ichinojo (1-3). Mitakeumi dug in fast against the 227-kilogram Mongolian and pushed Ichinojo out with a massive effort. The sekiwake pair had split their previous six meetings.

    Among the five lower-ranked wrestlers who started the day with spotless records, only No. 9 Hokutofuji and No. 15 Yoshikaze remain undefeated. Fan-favorite No. 3 Endo (1-3) picked up his first win for defeating No. 4 Chiyonokuni (1-3).

    Kyokutaisei (1-3), who went 10-5 in his makuuchi division debut in May, withdrew after suffering knee injuries in a bout against No. 10 Daieisho (2-2) on Tuesday. Kyokutaisei's stablemaster Tomozuna said there is a possibility the No. 11 maegashira will return to the tournament. "He was able to do a squat (on Tuesday evening)," Tomozuna said. "We'll look at the situation in a few days and if he can come back, he might re-enter".

    Swami
     
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  12. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Kisenosato is fighting hard for his sumo life. Real endurance sumo seen today from the yokozuna.

    Glad to see Yoshikaze at 4-0. That is indeed a turnaround from last basho. I'm hoping he gets his kachi-koshi this time around.

    Tomorrow will be interesting with Mitakeumi vs Tochinoshin.
     
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  13. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

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    That was a brutal bout of Tochinoshin's today.

    Ichinojo looks pathetic this time.

    Swami
     
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  14. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

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    Aki Day 5: All 3 yokozuna stay perfect
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 13 September 2018
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    Grand champion Hakuho survived a scare against komusubi Takakeisho on Thursday as all three yokozuna stayed undefeated at the Autumn Grand Sumo Tournament.

    Chasing his first victory over the all-time championship record holder, rising talent Takakeisho (1-4) looked to be on the verge of an upset on the fifth day of the 15-day tournament as he pushed Hakuho to the straw.

    However, the Mongolian grand champion sidestepped Takakeisho's attempt at a force out, pulling him off balance before slapping him to the floor of the ring at Ryogoku Kokugikan.

    In perhaps his strongest performance of the tournament so far, Kisenosato was once again made to backpedal before winning with an impressive overhand throw against Shodai, No. 3 among the rank-and-file maegashira.

    After securing an inside grip, Shodai (2-3) countered an attempted throw by Kisenosato and drove the Japanese yokozuna to the edge of the ring. But as the maegashira looked to gain a grip with both hands, Kisenosato sent him tumbling to the clay.

    The other Mongolian grand champion, Kakuryu, showed superior speed and technique against No. 2 maegashira Chiyotairyu to secure a routine win by front force out.

    Kakuryu was much faster than his opponent out of the blocks, getting an outside belt grip with his right hand and quickly driving Chiyotairyu (0-5) out backwards.

    Sekiwake Mitakeumi stayed perfect with a well-executed win over Georgian ozeki Tochinoshin (3-2).

    Winner of the previous tournament in Nagoya, Mitakeumi opened with a powerful two-handed thrust, preventing Tochinoshin from gaining a belt grip. With the powerful Georgian at the edge of the straw, the sekiwake forced him out backward.

    Mitakeumi, who could secure promotion to ozeki with a strong result at this tournament, said he welcomed the pressure that came with high expectations.

    "I think the pressure is positive. I knew Tochinoshin would try to grab my mawashi belt, so I wanted to go low and stay inside. He did get a left outside grip, but I was able to keep my hip placement low and move forward," Nagano Prefecture native Mitakeumi said.

    Ozeki Takayasu (5-0) demonstrated patience and strong technique to keep No. 1 Ikioi winless. The maegashira opened aggressively and applied an arm hold to his higher-ranked opponent, but Takayasu was able to slip from his grip before pushing him out from behind.

    The other ozeki, Goeido, improved to 4-1 with a default victory after his scheduled opponent, No. 2 maegashira Yutakayama (0-5), pulled out with an ankle injury.

    Sekiwake Ichinojo (2-3) broke his three-match losing streak with a force-out win over komusubi Tamawashi (0-5). The 227-kilogram Mongolian withstood an opening barrage before gaining an inside grip with both hands and hoisting his compatriot over the straw.

    Among the rank-and-file wrestlers, ninth-ranked Hokutofuji and 15th-ranked Yoshikaze maintained perfect records with push-out victories over No. 8 Kotoshogiku (3-2) and No. 14 Chiyomaru (1-4), respectively.

    Swami
     
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  15. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Hokutofuji has been looking good thus far. An important win for Mitakeumi over Tochinshin. I'm eager to see him against Goeido on Friday.

    Takakeisho was so close to upsetting Hakuho. I like Kisenosato and Kakuryu but always hope to see Hakuho lose. He's a great yokozuna, his record is amazing, but his vibe of arrogance rub me the wrong way.

    I'm thinking Ichinojo will get his kachi-koshi on day 15 like he has for the last two or three bashos. I'm glad I don't put money on his matches. I'd have empty pockets.
     
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  16. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

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    I still think Hakuho is very overrated. Not a patch on Chiyonofuji.

    Swami
     
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  17. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

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    Aki Day 6: Kisenosato dealt first loss
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 14 September 2018
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    Kisenosato © Kyodo

    Yokozuna Kisenosato tasted his first defeat of the Autumn Tournament, losing in an upset to No. 2 maegashira Chiyotairyu. The other two yokozuna remained undefeated, while ozeki Takayasu also maintained a perfect record.

    Seeking a quick result following a run of energy-sapping victories, Kisenosato charged his opponent from the jump in the final bout of the day. Chiyotairyu (1-5) sidestepped the yokozuna, however, slipping to his left before pushing him out.

    Hakuho beat No. 3 Shodai (2-4) after judges reversed an initial ruling handing the bout to the maegashira. Having taken an inside grip at the jump, the yokozuna drove Shodai to the edge of the straw before being toppled with a last-ditch overarm throw. After conferring in the center, the officials determined Shodai’s heel touched outside the ring while initiating the throw.

    Kakuryu continued to look the most impressive among the three yokozuna in his thrust-out victory over komusubi Tamawashi (0-6). After having his grip attempt deflected, Kakuryu used his quick hands and lower body strength to drive his compatriot out backward.

    Takayasu put on a powerful display against No. 1 maegashira Kaisei. The ozeki hit his opponent hard with an opening shoulder charge, then countered an attempted throw before forcing him out.

    Sekiwake Mitakeumi, winner of the previous tournament in Nagoya, suffered his first loss of the meet against ozeki Goeido (5-1). The ozeki drove Mitakeumi back from the jump, but the sekiwake dug in to halt his forward momentum. As both wrestlers gripped each other’s belt, Goeido dropped his hips low and bulldozed his way to the win.

    A day after being manhandled by Mitakeumi, ozeki Tochinoshin (4-2) bounced back with a decisive win over No. 1 Ikioi (0-6). Sporting a black eye courtesy of his Day 4 bout against Tamawashi, the powerfully built Georgian slipped to the side of the charging Ikioi and slapped him to the clay.

    Komusubi Takakeisho (2-4) scored an impressive win over sekiwake Ichinojo (2-4). Facing a 57-kg weight disadvantage against the biggest man in the division, Takakeisho jumped quickly out of the blocks, pushing and thrusting at Ichinojo, who was unable to secure a grip and stepped out backwards. Though Takakeisho has only two wins, both have come against top-ranked opponents. He beat Tochinoshin on the third day.

    No. 15 Yoshikaze (5-1) suffered his first loss of the meet against No. 13 Ryuden (5-1), leaving ninth-ranked Hokutofuji as the only undefeated rank-and-file wrestler following his triumph over No. 7 Tochiozan (2-4).

    Swami
     
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  18. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    A close call for Hakuho and not so good day for Kisenosato. I just hope Kisenosato bounces back from his loss.

    Kakuryu and Takayasu looked great this week.
     
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  19. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

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    As long as Kisenosato gets 10 or 11 wins he should be OK.

    Swami
     
  20. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Warrior

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    Aki Day 7: Kisenosato bounces back with hard-fought win
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 15 September 2018
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    A day after his first loss, grand champion Kisenosato bounced back with a hard-fought win over No. 4 maegashira Chiyonokuni at the Autumn Grand Sumo Tournament on Saturday. Ozeki Takayasu also stayed perfect as he maintained his pursuit for a breakthrough tournament victory.

    Kisenosato (6-1) once again looked less than convincing but nevertheless earned a rousing ovation after outlasting his rank-and-file opponent. Chiyonokuni (2-5) started the more aggressive of the two, slapping and thrusting while Kisenosato looked to gain a belt grip.

    The sole Japanese yokozuna, fighting for his career after missing an unprecedented eight meets through injury, withstood an attempted leg sweep before securing a left arm belt grip. The pair then grappled for position in an energy-sapping battle before the grand champion forced Chiyonokuni's foot over the straw as he attempted to initiate a throw.

    All-time championship record holder Hakuho barely broke a sweat in the penultimate bout of the day against No. 3 Endo (1-6). The maegashira flew at Hakuho from the jump but was pushed back and lost his footing, slipping to the clay.

    Kakuryu looked impressive with another dominant win, this time over No. 3 maegashira Shodai (2-5). Unable to secure a belt grip at the opening, the yokozuna quickly drove his opponent from the ring with a rapid-fire combination of slaps and thrusts.

    Ozeki Goeido (6-1) stayed one win off the pace by pushing out No. 2 Chiyotairyu (1-6). After delaying the start in a seemingly calculated move, Goeido came in fast from the jump, delivering a hard slap to Chiyotairyu's face before driving him out.

    Takayasu was able to conserve his energy in a relatively easy victory over komusubi Tamawashi (0-7). Tamawashi slammed hard into Takayasu at the jump but couldn't budge the powerfully built ozeki. While driving forward, Takayasu reversed course, pulling Tamawashi off balance before slapping him to the clay.

    Georgian-born ozeki Tochinoshin improved to 5-2 with a routine force-out victory over sekiwake Ichinojo (2-5). Ichinojo had the momentum at the jump, but Tochinoshin secured a belt grip before driving his shoulder into the towering Mongolian's chest and driving him out backwards.

    Sekiwake Mitakeumi (6-1) recovered from his first loss on Day 6 by outdueling komusubi Takakeisho (2-5) for a thrilling thrust-down victory. The winner of July's Nagoya Grand Tournament absorbed multiple roundhouse slaps to the face as he attacked the small but ultra-aggressive komusubi.

    Takakeisho drove Mitakeumi to the edge with a hand to the throat, but the sekiwake slipped to the side and executed the winning maneuver while teetering over the straw.

    No. 9 Hokutofuji, who started the day as the only unbeaten rank-and-file wrestler, improved to 7-0 with a force-out victory over No. 11 Sadanoumi (4-3).

    Swami
     

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